Form 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

 

x ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2011

OR

 

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM                     TO                     .

Commission File No. 001-32975

EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   20-4748747

(State or Other Jurisdiction of

Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

55 East 52 nd Street, New York, New York   10055
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)   (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (212) 857-3100

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Class A Common Stock, $0.01 par value   New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in the definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large Accelerated Filer  x    Accelerated Filer  ¨    Non-Accelerated Filer  ¨    Smaller Reporting Company  ¨
      (do not check if a smaller reporting company)   

Indicate by check whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x

The aggregate market value of the voting and nonvoting common equity of the registrant held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2011 was approximately $879.1 million, based on the closing price of the registrant’s Class A common stock reported on the New York Stock Exchange on such date of $33.32 per share and on the par value of the registrant’s Class B common stock, par value $0.01 per share.

The number of shares of the registrant’s Class A common stock, par value $0.01 per share, outstanding as of February 21, 2012, was 28,840,121. The number of shares of the registrant’s Class B common stock, par value $0.01 per share, outstanding as of February 21, 2012 was 47 (excluding 53 shares of Class B common stock held by a subsidiary of the registrant).

Documents Incorporated by Reference

Portions of the definitive Proxy Statement of Evercore Partners Inc. to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A of the general rules and regulations under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, for the 2012 annual meeting of stockholders to be held on June 7, 2012 (“Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

         Page  

PART I

    

Item 1.

  Business      3   

Item 1A.

  Risk Factors      12   

Item 1B.

  Unresolved Staff Comments      24   

Item 2.

  Properties      24   

Item 3.

  Legal Proceedings      25   

Item 4.

  Mine Safety Disclosures      25   

PART II

    

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

     26   

Item 6.

  Selected Financial Data      28   

Item 7.

  Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations      29   

Item 7A.

  Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk      52   

Item 8.

  Financial Statements and Supplemental Data      53   

Item 9.

  Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure      108   

Item 9A.

  Controls and Procedures      108   

Item 9B.

  Other Information      110   

PART III

    

Item 10.

  Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance      111   

Item 11.

  Executive Compensation      111   

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

     111   

Item 13.

  Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence      111   

Item 14.

  Principal Accountant Fees and Services      111   

PART IV

    

Item 15.

  Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules      112   


Table of Contents

PART I

Available Information

Our website address is www.evercore.com. We make available free of charge on the Investor Relations section of our website (http://ir.evercore.com) our Annual Report on Form 10-K (“Form 10-K”), Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed or furnished with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; as amended (the “Exchange Act”). We also make available through our website other reports filed with or furnished to the SEC under the Exchange Act, including our Proxy Statements and reports filed by officers and directors under Section 16(a) of that Act, as well as our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics. From time to time we may use our website as a channel of distribution of material company information. Financial and other material information regarding the Company is routinely posted on and accessible at http://ir.evercore.com. In addition, you may automatically receive email alerts and other information about us by enrolling your email by visiting the “Email Alert” section at http://ir.evercore.com. We do not intend for information contained in our website to be part of this Form 10-K.

Any materials we file with the SEC may be read and copied at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, DC, 20549. Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains an Internet site (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.

In this report, references to “Evercore”, the “Company”, “we”, “us” and “our” refer to Evercore Partners Inc., a Delaware corporation, and its consolidated subsidiaries. Unless the context otherwise requires, references to (1) “Evercore Partners Inc.” refer solely to Evercore Partners Inc., and not to any of its consolidated subsidiaries and (2) “Evercore LP” refer solely to Evercore LP, a Delaware limited partnership, and not to any of its consolidated subsidiaries. References to the “IPO” refer to our initial public offering on August 10, 2006 of 4,542,500 shares of our Class A common stock, including shares issued to the underwriters of the IPO pursuant to their election to exercise in full their overallotment option.

Forward-Looking Statements

This report contains or incorporates by reference forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933 and Section 21E of the Exchange Act, which reflect our current views with respect to, among other things, our operations and financial performance. In some cases, you can identify these forward-looking statements by the use of words such as “outlook”, “believes”, “expects”, “potential”, “continues”, “may”, “should”, “seeks”, “approximately”, “predicts”, “intends”, “plans”, “estimates”, “anticipates” or the negative version of these words or other comparable words. Such forward-looking statements are subject to various risks and uncertainties.

Accordingly, there are or will be important factors that could cause actual outcomes or results to differ materially from those indicated in these statements. All statements other than statements of historical fact are forward-looking statements and, based on various underlying assumptions and expectations, are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties and assumptions and may include projections of our future financial performance based on our growth strategies and anticipated trends in Evercore’s business. We believe these factors include, but are not limited to, those described under “Risk Factors”. These factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read in conjunction with the other cautionary statements that are included or incorporated by reference in this report. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or review any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise. You should, however, consult further disclosures we may make in future filings of our Annual Reports on Form 10-K,

 

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Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q and Current Reports on Form 8-K and any amendments thereto or in future press releases or other public statements.

We operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks and uncertainties emerge from time to time, and it is not possible for our management to predict all risks and uncertainties, nor can management assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements.

 

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Item 1. Business

Overview

Evercore is one of the leading independent investment banking advisory firms in the world based on the dollar volume of announced worldwide merger and acquisition (“M&A”) transactions on which we have advised since 2000. When we use the term independent investment banking advisory firm, we mean an investment banking firm that directly or through its affiliates does not engage in commercial banking or proprietary trading activities. We were founded on the belief that there is an opportunity within the investment banking industry for a firm free of the potential conflicts of interest created within large, multi-product financial institutions. We also believed that the broad set of relationships of an independent advisory business would provide the foundation for a differentiated investment management platform. We believe maintaining standards of excellence and integrity in our core businesses demands a spirit of cooperation and hands-on participation more commonly found in smaller organizations. Since our inception, we have set out to build—in the employees we choose and in the projects we undertake—an organization dedicated to the highest caliber of professionalism and integrity.

We operate globally through two business segments:

 

   

Investment Banking; and

 

   

Investment Management.

Our Investment Banking segment includes our Advisory services, through which we provide advice to clients on significant mergers, acquisitions, divestitures and other strategic corporate transactions, with a particular focus on advising prominent multinational corporations and substantial private equity firms on large, complex transactions. We also provide restructuring advice to companies in financial transition, as well as to creditors, shareholders and potential acquirers. In addition, we provide our clients with capital markets advice, underwrite securities offerings and raise funds for financial sponsors. Our Investment Banking segment also includes our Institutional Equities services through which we offer equity research and agency-only equity securities trading for institutional investors.

Our Investment Management segment focuses on Institutional Asset Management, through which we manage financial assets for sophisticated institutional investors and provide independent fiduciary services to corporate employee benefit plans, Wealth Management, through which we provide wealth management services for high net-worth individuals, and Private Equity, through which we manage private equity funds. Each of these businesses is led by senior investment professionals with extensive experience in their respective fields.

During 2011, we expanded our global Investment Banking presence through the acquisition of The Lexicon Partnership LLP (“Lexicon”), a leading independent UK-based investment banking advisory firm. In December 2011, we purchased a 45% interest in ABS Investment Management, LLC (“ABS”), an institutionally focused fund-of-funds manager, expanding our Investment Management affiliate network.

Investment Banking

At December 31, 2011, our Investment Banking segment had 60 Senior Managing Directors—39 in the United States, 7 in Mexico, 13 in Europe and 1 in Hong Kong—and 15 Senior Advisors with expertise and client relationships in a wide variety of industry sectors, as well as 32 senior research and sales professionals in Institutional Equities.

In 2011, our Investment Banking segment generated $430.6 million, or 81%, of our revenues, excluding Other Revenue, net, and earned advisory fees from 245 clients.

 

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Advisory

We provide confidential, strategic and tactical advice to both public and private companies, with a particular focus on large, multinational corporations. By virtue of their prominence, size and sophistication, many of our clients are more likely to require expertise relating to larger and more complex situations. We are advising or have advised on numerous noteworthy transactions, including:

 

•    Kinder Morgan on its pending acquisition of El Paso

  

•    The McGraw Hill Companies on its intended split into separate Global Markets and Education businesses

•    Kraft Foods on its pending split into separate Global Snacks and North American Grocery businesses

  

•    sanofi-aventis on its acquisition of Genzyme

•    Southern Union Company on its pending sale to Energy Transfer

  

•    Exelon on its pending acquisition of Constellation Energy

•    CenturyLink on its merger with Qwest Communications

  

•    The Lubrizol Corporation on its sale to Berkshire Hathaway

•    Burlington Northern Santa Fe on its sale to Berkshire Hathaway

  

•    General Motors on its IPO, its restructuring, including the Delphi restructuring and various other matters

•    MGM Mirage on its recapitalization

  

•    LyondellBasell on its restructuring

•    The Special Committee of Time Warner Cable on its separation from Time Warner

  

•    CIT on its restructuring

•    Tyco on its split-up

  

•    AT&T on its acquisition of BellSouth

•    CVS on its acquisition of Caremark

  

•    SBC on its acquisition of AT&T and on Cingular’s acquisition of AT&T Wireless

Our approach is to work as a trusted senior advisor to top corporate officers and boards of directors, helping them devise strategies for enhancing shareholder value. We believe this relationship-based approach to our Advisory business gives us a competitive advantage in serving a distinct need in the market today. Furthermore, we believe our Advisory services are differentiated from that of our competitors in the following respects:

 

   

Objective Advice with a Long-Term Perspective. We seek to recommend shareholder value enhancement strategies or other financial strategies that we would pursue ourselves were we acting in management’s capacity. This approach often includes advising our clients against pursuing transactions that we believe do not meet that standard.

 

   

Transaction Excellence. Since the beginning of 2000, we have advised on over $1.5 trillion of announced transactions, including acquisitions, sale processes, mergers of equals, special committee advisory assignments, recapitalizations and restructurings. We have provided significant advisory services on multiple transactions for AT&T (including its predecessor company, SBC), CVS, General Mills, General Motors and Swiss Re, among others.

 

   

Senior Level Attention and Experience. The Senior Managing Directors in our Advisory business participate in all facets of client interaction, from the initial evaluation phase to the final stage of executing our recommendations.

 

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We advise clients in a number of different situations across many industries and geographies, each of which may require various services:

 

   

Mergers and Acquisitions. When we advise companies about the potential acquisition of another company or certain assets, our services include evaluating potential acquisition targets, providing valuation analyses, evaluating and proposing financial and strategic alternatives and rendering, if appropriate, fairness opinions. We also may advise as to the timing, structure, financing and pricing of a proposed acquisition and assist in negotiating and closing the acquisition.

 

   

Divestitures and Sale Transactions. When we advise clients that are contemplating the sale of certain businesses, assets or their entire company, our services include evaluating and recommending financial and strategic alternatives with respect to a sale, advising on the appropriate sales process for the situation and valuation issues, assisting in preparing an offering memorandum or other appropriate sales materials and rendering, if appropriate, fairness opinions. We also identify and contact selected qualified acquirers and assist in negotiating and closing the sale.

 

   

Special Committee and Fairness Opinion Assignments. We are well known for our independence, quality and thoroughness and devoting senior-level attention throughout the project lifecycle. We believe our objectivity, integrity and discretion allow us to provide an unbiased perspective.

 

   

Restructuring. We provide financial advice and investment banking services to companies in financial transition, as well as to creditors, shareholders and potential acquirers. Our services may include reviewing and analyzing the business, financial condition and prospects of the company or providing advice on strategic transactions, capital raising or restructurings. We also may provide advisory services to companies that have sought or are planning to seek protection under Chapter 11 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code or other similar processes in non-U.S. jurisdictions.

 

   

Capital Markets. We serve as an objective advisor to corporations and financial sponsors on a broad array of financing issues. We have developed an expertise in assisting clients with respect to the entire spectrum of capital structure decisions. In addition, we act as an underwriter in public offerings and private placements of debt and equity securities in the U.S. and internationally.

 

   

Private Funds. The Private Funds Group (“PFG”) advises fund sponsors on all aspects of the fundraising process. The group is headquartered in London, with personnel in Europe, the United States and Asia.

We strive to earn repeat business from our clients. However, we operate in a highly competitive environment in which there are no long-term contracted sources of revenue. Each revenue-generating engagement is separately negotiated and awarded. To develop new client relationships and to develop new engagements from historical client relationships, we maintain an active dialogue with a large number of clients and potential clients, as well as with their financial and legal advisors, on an ongoing basis. We have gained new clients each year through our business development initiatives, through recruiting additional senior professionals who bring with them client relationships and through referrals from directors, attorneys and other third parties with whom we have relationships.

Institutional Equities

In June 2010, we commenced our U.S. Institutional Equities operations. This business distributes equity research and engages in agency-only equity securities trading for institutional investors.

 

   

Equity Research. Our research analysts perform research to help our clients understand the dynamics that drive the industries and companies under coverage. We seek to differentiate ourselves through originality of perspective, depth of insight and ability to uncover industry trends. Our research analysts cover major industry developments, publish research on industry sectors, provide fundamental, company-specific coverage and identify and evaluate investment opportunities in publicly-traded companies.

 

   

Institutional Sales and Trading. Our professionals provide equity securities sales and trading services to institutional investors and seek to develop strong relationships with the portfolio managers and traders they serve by working closely with our equity research professionals.

 

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Investment Management

Our Investment Management segment includes Institutional Asset Management, in the United States through Evercore Trust Company, N.A. (“ETC”), Atalanta Sosnoff Capital LLC (“Atalanta Sosnoff”) and ABS and in Latin America through Protego Casa de Bolsa, S.A. de C.V. (“PCB” or “Protego”) and G5 Holdings S.A. (“G5”); Wealth Management, through Evercore Wealth Management (“EWM”) and Evercore Pan-Asset Capital Management (“Pan”); and Private Equity. Our Investment Management business principally manages and invests capital on behalf of third parties, including a broad range of institutional investors such as corporate and public pension funds, endowments, foundations, insurance companies, family offices and high net-worth individuals. Our Investment Management business is led by highly-experienced Portfolio and Client Relationship Managers. In October 2011, Evercore Asset Management L.L.C. (“EAM”), formerly included within Institutional Asset Management, announced its plan to wind down its business, which was completed in December 2011.

In 2011, our Investment Management segment generated revenue of $99.2 million. As of December 31, 2011, we had $13.0 billion of assets under management (“AUM”) excluding any AUM from our non-consolidated affiliates, of which $9.2 billion was attributable to Institutional Asset Management, $3.2 billion was attributable to Wealth Management and $0.6 billion was attributable to Private Equity clients.

Institutional Asset Management

Within our Institutional Asset Management business, Atalanta Sosnoff manages large-capitalization U.S. equity and balanced products, PCB primarily manages Mexican fixed income products and offers fiduciary and trust services and ETC provides specialized investment management, independent fiduciary and trustee services.

In December 2011, we completed our acquisition of a 45% interest in ABS, an institutionally focused hedge fund-of-funds manager.

Wealth Management

Wealth Management provides services through EWM and Pan. EWM targets clients with more than $5 million in investable assets and offers services such as investment policy creation, asset allocation, customized investment management, manager selection, performance reporting and financial planning. Pan provides asset allocation advisory services and products to high net-worth individuals, charities and endowments, principally in the UK.

Private Equity

Private Equity manages value-oriented, middle-market private equity funds in both the United States and Mexico. While we do not intend to raise Evercore-sponsored successor funds in the United States or Europe, on February 11, 2010, we announced the formation of a strategic alliance to pursue private equity investment opportunities with Trilantic Capital Partners (“Trilantic”) and to collaborate on the future growth of Trilantic’s business. We own a minority economic interest in Trilantic and an interest in Trilantic’s current fund, Trilantic Global Fund IV, and have agreed to commit 2.5% of the total capital commitments of Trilantic’s next private equity fund when it is raised, up to $50 million.

 

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Our Strategies for Growth

We intend to continue to grow and diversify our Investment Banking and Investment Management businesses, and to further enhance our profile and competitive position, through the following strategies:

 

   

Add Highly Qualified Investment Banking Professionals with Industry and Product Expertise. We have taken action in a competitive environment by hiring 7 new Senior Managing Directors in the last 12 months, in sectors such as energy, restructuring, technology and industrials. In August 2011, we completed our acquisition of Lexicon, significantly increasing our presence with the addition of 7 Senior Managing Directors, 8 Senior Advisors and approximately 100 employees in the UK and Hong Kong. We intend to continue to recruit high-caliber advisory, funds placement, research and sales and trading professionals to add depth in industry sectors and products and services in areas that we believe we already have strength, and to extend our reach to sectors or new business lines we have identified as particularly attractive.

 

   

Achieve Organic Growth and Improved Profitability in Investment Management and Opportunistically Pursue Inorganic Growth. We are focused on managing our current Investment Management business towards growth and improved profitability. We also continue to evaluate opportunities to expand through financially attractive acquisitions. In particular, we seek to ensure that the Investment Management businesses we acquire are capable of strong, repeatable investment performance and that our transactions are structured in a manner that aligns the interests of each management team with our own. We believe that the current market and competitive environment provide attractive opportunities to grow our Investment Management business.

 

   

Expand Into New Geographic Markets. We are expanding into new geographic markets where we believe the business environment will be receptive to the strengths of our Investment Banking and Investment Management business models or where we believe our clients have or may develop a significant presence. Our recent expansion in Europe and Hong Kong, as well as our advisory affiliates and alliances in Brazil, Japan, China, South Korea and India, represent important steps in this strategy. We are actively seeking to strengthen, expand and deepen these alliances and to enter into new arrangements in additional geographies. We may hire groups of talented professionals or pursue additional strategic acquisitions or alliances with highly-regarded regional or local firms whose cultures and operating principles are similar to ours.

Results by Segment and Geographic Location

See Note 22 to our consolidated financial statements for additional information regarding our segment results and the geographic areas from which we derive our revenues.

People

As of December 31, 2011, we employed more than 800 people worldwide. Our senior professionals play a significant role in driving growth and are measured by their productivity either through revenue per Senior Managing Director or other metrics including asset growth for Portfolio and Client Relationship Managers. None of our employees are subject to any collective bargaining agreements, and we believe we have good relations with our employees.

As a leading independent investment banking firm, our core asset is our professional staff, including their intellectual capital and their dedication to providing the highest quality services to our clients. Prior to joining Evercore, many of our Senior Managing Directors, Portfolio and Client Relationship Managers and Senior Research and Sales and Trading Professionals held senior level positions with other leading corporations, financial services firms or investment firms.

 

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Competition

The financial services industry is intensely competitive, and we expect it to remain so. Our competitors are other investment banking, financial advisory and investment management firms. We compete both globally and on a regional, product or niche basis. We compete on the basis of a number of factors, including transaction execution skills, investment performance, our range of products and services, innovation, reputation and price.

We believe our primary competitors in securing advisory, restructuring and capital markets advisory engagements include large universal banks and investment banking firms such as Bank of America, Barclays, Citigroup, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan Chase, Morgan Stanley and UBS and independent firms such as Lazard and Rothschild and boutique firms such as Blackstone, Centerview, Greenhill, Moelis and Perella Weinberg, among others. Our Institutional Equities business is subject to competition from investment banks and other large and small financial institutions who offer similar services.

We believe that we face a range of competitors in our Investment Management business, with numerous other firms providing competitive services in each of our sectors. In Institutional Asset Management, each of Atalanta Sosnoff, ABS, PCB and ETC face substantial competition from a large number of asset management and trust companies, many of which are larger, more established firms with greater brand name recognition and more extensive client networks and product offerings. Wealth Management competes with domestic and global private banks, regional broker-dealers, independent broker-dealers, registered investment advisors, commercial banks, trust companies and other financial services firms offering wealth management services to clients, many of which have substantially greater resources and offer a broader range of services. In Private Equity, our competition includes private equity funds of all sizes.

Competition is also intense for the attraction and retention of qualified employees. Our ability to continue to compete effectively in our businesses will depend upon our ability to attract new employees and retain and motivate our existing employees.

Regulation

United States

Our business, as well as the financial services industry generally, is subject to extensive regulation in the United States and elsewhere. As a matter of public policy, regulatory bodies in the United States and the rest of the world are charged with safeguarding the integrity of the securities and other financial markets and with protecting the interests of customers participating in those markets, not with protecting the interests of our shareholders or creditors. In the United States, the SEC is the federal agency responsible for the administration of the federal securities laws. Evercore Group L.L.C. (“EGL”), a wholly-owned subsidiary of ours through which we conduct our investment banking business, is registered as a broker-dealer with the SEC and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”), and is registered as a broker-dealer in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. EGL is subject to regulation and oversight by the SEC. FINRA, a self-regulatory organization that is subject to oversight by the SEC, adopts and enforces rules governing the conduct, and examines the activities, of its member firms, including EGL. State securities regulators also have regulatory or oversight authority over EGL. In addition, EGL is subject to regulation as a municipal advisor by the Municipal Securities Rulemaking Board with respect to PFG’s activities as placement agent for investment funds that may seek to solicit capital from certain public pension funds. PFG is also impacted by various state and local regulations that restrict or prohibit the use of placement agents in connection with investments by public pension funds, including regulations in New York, Illinois, Ohio, California and New Mexico. Similar measures are being considered or have been implemented in other jurisdictions.

Broker-dealers are subject to regulations that cover all aspects of the securities business, including sales methods, trade practices, use and safekeeping of customers’ funds and securities, capital structure, record-keeping, the financing of customers’ purchases and the conduct and qualifications of directors, officers and employees. In particular, as a registered broker-dealer and member of a self-regulatory organization, we are

 

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subject to the SEC’s uniform net capital rule, Rule 15c3-1. Rule 15c3-1 specifies the minimum level of net capital a broker-dealer must maintain and also requires that a significant part of a broker-dealer’s assets be kept in relatively liquid form. The SEC and various self-regulatory organizations impose rules that require notification when net capital falls below certain predefined criteria, limit the ratio of subordinated debt to equity in the regulatory capital composition of a broker-dealer and constrain the ability of a broker-dealer to expand its business under certain circumstances. Additionally, the SEC’s uniform net capital rule imposes certain requirements that may have the effect of prohibiting a broker-dealer from distributing or withdrawing capital and requiring prior notice to the SEC for certain withdrawals of capital. Our broker-dealer subsidiary is also subject to regulations, including the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001 (the “Patriot Act”), which impose obligations regarding the prevention and detection of money-laundering activities, including the establishment of customer due diligence and other compliance policies and procedures. Failure to comply with these requirements may result in monetary, regulatory and, in certain cases, criminal penalties.

We are also subject to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, which prohibits offering, promising, giving, or authorizing others to give anything of value, either directly or indirectly, to a non-U.S. government official in order to influence official action or otherwise gain an unfair business advantage, such as to obtain or retain business.

Three of our affiliates, EWM, ABS and Atalanta-Sosnoff, are registered as investment advisors with the SEC. In addition, as a result of recent regulatory initiatives, Evercore Advisors L.L.C., as investment advisor to Evercore Capital Partners II L.P. and its affiliated entities (“ECP II”), has become subject to the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 and has registered with the SEC as an investment advisor. Registered investment advisors are subject to the requirements and regulations of the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. Such requirements relate to, among other things, fiduciary duties to clients, maintaining an effective compliance program, solicitation agreements, conflicts of interest, recordkeeping and reporting requirements, disclosure requirements, limitations on agency cross and principal transactions between an advisor and advisory clients, state and local political contributions, as well as general anti-fraud prohibitions. EWM is also an investment advisor, which subjects EWM to additional regulations under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”). ETC, which is limited to fiduciary activities, is regulated by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”), is a member bank of the Federal Reserve System and is subject to the Patriot Act.

Mexico

PCB is authorized by the Mexican Ministry of Finance to act as a broker-dealer and financial advisor in accordance with the Mexican Securities Market Law. PCB is subject to regulation and oversight by the Mexican Ministry of Finance and the Mexican National Banking and Securities Commission, including the maintenance of minimum capital requirements. In addition, the Mexican Broker Dealer Association, a self-regulatory organization that is subject to oversight by the Mexican National Banking and Securities Commission, adopts and enforces rules governing the conduct, and examines the activities of, its member broker-dealers, including PCB. Since August 2009, PCB has been authorized by the Mexican National Banking and Securities Commission to act as a trustee and to operate in the equity markets.

United Kingdom

Authorization by the Financial Services Authority (“FSA”). Evercore Partners International LLP and Pan are subject to regulation in the United Kingdom by the FSA. The current UK regulatory regime is based upon the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (the “FSMA”), together with secondary legislation and other rules made under the FSMA. Under section 19 of the FSMA, it is an offense for any person to carry on “regulated activities” in the United Kingdom unless it is an authorized person or otherwise exempt from the need to be authorized. The various “regulated activities” are set out in the FSMA (Regulated Activities) Order 2001 (as amended). They include, among other things: advising on investments; arranging deals in investments; dealing in investments as agent; managing investments (i.e., portfolio management) and the safeguarding and administration of assets (including the arranging of such safeguarding and administration).

 

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Regulatory capital. Regulatory capital requirements form an integral part of the FSA’s prudential supervision of FSA authorized firms. The regulatory capital rules oblige firms to hold a certain amount of capital at all times (taking into account the particular risks to which the firm may be exposed given its business activities), thereby helping to ensure that firms can meet their liabilities as they fall due and safeguarding their (and their counterparties’) financial stability. The FSA also expects firms to take a proactive approach to monitoring and managing risks, consistent with its high level requirement for firms to have adequate financial resources. Regulatory capital requirements exist on two levels. The first is a solo requirement aimed at individual authorized entities (with the relevant firm being required to submit periodic reports to demonstrate compliance with the relevant requirement). The second is a consolidated (or group) requirement and relates to a part of or the entire group of which an authorized firm or firms form part. The FSA’s rules in relation to capital requirements were updated in 2007 to implement the recast EU Capital Requirements Directive (“CRD”), which came fully into force in the UK in January 2007. The CRD, which amended two capital requirements directives (The Banking Consolidation Directive and the Capital Adequacy Directive), introduced a more risk-sensitive approach to capital adequacy (with a particular emphasis on operational risk).

Anti-Money Laundering and Anti-Bribery. The UK Money Laundering Regulations 2007 came into force on December 15, 2007. The regulations, which implement the Third EU Money Laundering Directive, require firms to have procedures in place to prevent money laundering and to take a risk-based approach to focus the efforts where they are most needed. This approach includes client due diligence, monitoring, staff training and awareness. Failure to maintain the necessary procedures is a criminal offense. The Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 also contains a number of offenses in relation to money laundering. Our UK affiliates are also subject to the UK Bribery Act 2010, which became effective in July 2011 and provides for criminal penalties for bribery of, or receipt of a bribe from, public officials, corporations and individuals, as well as for the failure of an organization to prevent a person with whom it is associated from providing bribes for the organization’s benefit.

Regulatory Framework in the European Union. Evercore Europe has obtained the appropriate European investment services passport rights to provide cross-border services into a number of other members of the European Economic Area (“EEA”). This “passport” derives from the pan-European regime established by the EU Markets in Financial Instruments Directive (“MiFID”), which regulates the provision of investment services and activities throughout the EEA. MiFID provides investment firms which are authorized in any one EEA member state the right to provide investment services on a cross-border basis, or through the establishment of a branch to clients located in other EEA member states (known as “host member states”) on the basis of their home member state authorization without the need for separate authorization by the competent authorities in the relevant host member state. This practice is known as “passporting”. MiFID was required to be implemented across the EEA on November 1, 2007. MiFID made substantial and important changes to the way in which our business is conducted across the EEA. These include, among others, an extension to the scope of the “passport” but also clarification that the conduct of business rules of a host member state are not to apply to a firm providing services within its territory on a cross-border basis (host member state conduct of business rules will apply to branches). Evercore Europe has implemented MiFID, and we believe our business is now compliant with the requirements of MiFID.

Hong Kong

In Hong Kong, the Securities and Futures Commission (“SFC”) regulates our subsidiary, Evercore Asia Limited. The compliance requirements of the SFC include, among other things, net capital requirements and stockholders’ equity requirements. The SFC regulates the activities of the officers, directors, employees and other persons affiliated with Evercore Asia Limited, and require the registration of such persons.

General

Certain of our businesses are subject to compliance with laws and regulations of U.S. federal and state governments, non-U.S. governments, their respective agencies and/or various self-regulatory organizations or

 

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exchanges relating to, among other things, the privacy of client information, and any failure to comply with these regulations could expose us to liability and/or reputational damage. Additional legislation, changes in rules promulgated by financial authorities and self-regulatory organizations or changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules, either in the United States or elsewhere, may directly affect our mode of operation and profitability.

The U.S. and non-U.S. government agencies and self-regulatory organizations, as well as state securities commissions in the United States and Mexican Financial Authorities, are empowered to conduct periodic examinations and initiate administrative proceedings that can result in censure, fine, the issuance of cease-and-desist orders or the suspension or expulsion of a regulated entity or its directors, officers or employees.

 

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Item 1A. Risk Factors

Risks Related to Our Business

Difficult market conditions may adversely affect our business in many ways, including reducing the volume of the transactions involving our Investment Banking business and reducing the value of the assets we manage in our Investment Management businesses, which, in each case, may materially reduce our revenue or income.

As a financial services firm, our businesses are materially affected by conditions in the global financial markets and economic conditions throughout the world. Global financial markets and economic conditions are negatively impacted by many factors beyond our control, including the inability to access credit markets, rising interest rates or inflation, terrorism or political uncertainty. Financial market and economic conditions have been volatile in the last several years, and challenging conditions have persisted. A continuation of these conditions could reduce the demand for our services and present new challenges. Revenue generated by our Investment Banking business is directly related to the volume and value of the transactions in which we are involved. During periods of unfavorable market and economic conditions, our operating results may be adversely affected by a decrease in the volume and value of M&A transactions and increasing price competition among financial services companies seeking advisory engagements. Unfavorable market conditions also may lead to a reduction in revenues from our trading, underwriting and placement agent activities. In addition, Europe’s debt crisis could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition, particularly with respect to our recently expanded UK Advisory business. The possibility that certain EU member states will default on their debt obligations has negatively impacted economic conditions and global markets. The continued uncertainty over the outcome of international and the EU’s financial support programs and the possibility that other EU member states may experience similar financial troubles could further disrupt global markets. See “—A portion of our revenues are derived from our international operations, which are subject to certain risks.”

In the event of a market or general economic downturn, our Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management businesses would also be expected to generate lower revenue because the management fees we receive are typically based on the market value of the securities that comprise the assets we manage. In addition, due to uncertainty or volatility in the market or in response to difficult market conditions, clients may withdraw funds from these businesses in favor of investments they perceive as offering greater opportunity or lower risk. Difficult market conditions can also materially adversely affect our ability to launch new products or offer new services in our Institutional Asset Management or Wealth Management businesses, which could negatively affect our ability to increase AUM. In each case, management fees based on AUM would be negatively affected. Moreover, difficult market conditions may negatively impact the private equity funds that we manage by further reducing valuations and curtailing opportunities to exit and realize value from their investments.

Our profitability may also be adversely affected by our fixed costs and costs associated with new or expanded lines of business and the possibility that we would be unable to scale back these costs within a time frame sufficient to match any decreases in revenue relating to changes in market and economic conditions.

We depend on our senior professionals, including our executive officers, and the loss of their services could have a material adverse effect on us.

Our senior leadership team’s reputations and relationships with clients and potential clients are critical elements in maintaining and expanding our businesses. For example, our Investment Banking business is dependent on our senior Investment Banking professionals and on a small number of senior research analysts, traders and executives. In addition, Atalanta Sosnoff, EWM and ETC are dependent on a small number of senior portfolio managers and executives. Further, the operations and performance of G5, ABS and Pan are dependent on a small number of senior executives. Our professionals possess substantial experience and expertise and strong client relationships. The loss of these personnel could jeopardize our relationships with clients and result in the loss of client engagements and revenues.

 

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If we are unable to consummate additional acquisitions, alliances or joint ventures on attractive terms, or successfully identify and hire productive individuals to join our firm, we may not be able to implement our growth strategy successfully.

Our growth strategy is based, in part, on expanding our various businesses through additional acquisitions, entering into joint ventures and strategic alliances, and internally developing new opportunities that are complementary to our existing businesses and where we think we can add substantial value or generate substantial returns. The success of this strategy will depend on, among other things:

 

   

the availability of suitable opportunities and capital resources to effect our strategy;

 

   

the level of competition from other companies that may have greater financial resources than we do or may not require the same level of disclosure of these activities;

 

   

our ability to value acquisition and investment candidates accurately and negotiate acceptable terms for those acquisitions and investments; and

 

   

our ability to identify and enter into mutually beneficial relationships with joint venture partners.

Our growth strategy also relies on our ability to attract and retain profitable senior finance professionals across all of our businesses. Due to the early stage of development of many of our businesses and competition from other firms, we may face difficulties in recruiting and retaining professionals of a caliber consistent with our business strategy. In particular, many of our competitors are significantly larger with greater financial resources, and may be able to offer more attractive compensation packages and broader career opportunities. Additionally, it may take more than one year for us to determine whether new Advisory professionals will be profitable or effective, during which time we may incur significant expenses and expend significant time and resources on training, integration and business development.

If we are not successful in implementing our growth strategy, our business and results and the market price for our Class A common stock may be adversely affected.

Our inability to develop, integrate and manage recently added capabilities, joint ventures, alliances and acquired businesses successfully could have adverse consequences to our business.

Integrating acquired businesses, providing a platform for new businesses and partnering with other firms involve a number of risks and present financial, managerial and operational challenges, including the following factors, among others:

 

   

loss of key employees or customers;

 

   

possible inconsistencies in or conflicts between standards, controls, procedures and policies and the need to implement company-wide financial, accounting, information technology and other systems;

 

   

failure to maintain the quality of services that have historically been provided;

 

   

failure to coordinate geographically diverse organizations; and

 

   

the diversion of management’s attention from our day-to-day business as a result of the need to manage any disruptions and difficulties and the need to add management resources to do so.

In addition, acquisitions, start-ups and internally developed initiatives generally result in increased operating and administrative costs as the necessary infrastructure, IT and legal and compliance systems, controls and personnel are put in place. Our inability to develop, integrate and manage acquired companies, joint ventures or other strategic relationships and growth initiatives in an efficient and cost-effective manner, or at all, could have material adverse short- and long-term effects on our operating results, financial condition and liquidity.

 

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We may not realize the cost savings, revenue enhancements or other benefits that we expected from our acquisitions and other growth initiatives.

Our analyses of the benefits and costs of expanding our businesses necessarily involve assumptions as to future events, including general business and industry conditions, the longevity of specific customer engagements and relationships, operating costs and competitive factors, many of which are beyond our control and may not materialize. While we believe our analyses and their underlying assumptions to be reasonable, they are estimates that are necessarily speculative in nature. In addition, new regulatory requirements and conflicts may reduce the synergies that we expect to result from our growth initiatives. Even if we achieve the expected benefits, we may not be able to achieve them within the anticipated time frame. Also, the cost savings and other synergies from these acquisitions may be offset by costs incurred in integrating the companies, increases in other expenses or problems in the business unrelated to these acquisitions. In the case of joint ventures, we are subject to additional risks and uncertainties in that we may be dependent upon, and subject to liability, losses or reputational damage relating to personnel, systems and activities that are not under our direct and sole control, and conflicts and disagreements between us and our joint venture partners may negatively impact our business.

Additionally, acquiring the equity of an existing business or substantially all of the assets of a company may expose us to liability for actions taken by an acquired business and its management before the acquisition. The due diligence we conduct in connection with an acquisition and any contractual guarantees or indemnities that we receive from the sellers of acquired companies may not be sufficient to protect us from, or compensate us for, actual liabilities. A material liability associated with an acquisition, especially where there is no right to indemnification, could adversely affect our operating results, financial condition and liquidity.

Our growth has placed, and will continue to place, significant demands on our administrative, operational and financial resources.

We have experienced significant growth in the past several years, including in our Investment Banking business, by expanding into sales, trading, research and underwriting activities, entering into strategic alliances, acquiring Lexicon and the hiring of additional senior professionals in our Advisory group, and in our Investment Management business through the acquisition of Atalanta Sosnoff and investment in ABS. Supporting this growth has placed significant demands on our operational, legal, regulatory and financial systems and resources for integration, training and business development efforts. We are often required to commit additional resources to maintain appropriate operational, legal, regulatory and financial systems to adequately support expansion, even when we only partner, enter into strategic alliances or take minority stakes in other businesses. We expect our growth to continue, which could place additional demands on our resources and increase our expenses. We cannot provide assurance that our financial controls, the level of knowledge of our personnel, our operational abilities, our legal and compliance controls and our other corporate support systems will be adequate to manage our expanding operations effectively. Any failure to do so could adversely affect our ability to pursue our growth strategy, generate revenue and control expenses.

Our revenue and profits are highly volatile, which may make it difficult for us to achieve steady earnings growth on a quarterly basis and may cause the price of our Class A common stock to decline.

Our revenue and profits are highly volatile. We generally derive Investment Banking revenue from a limited number of engagements that generate significant fees at key transaction milestones, such as closing, and the timing of these milestones is outside of our control. As a result, our financial results will likely fluctuate from quarter to quarter based on the timing of when those fees are earned. It may be difficult for us to achieve steady earnings growth on a quarterly basis, which could, in turn, lead to large adverse movements in the price of our Class A common stock or increased volatility in our stock price generally.

We earn a majority of our revenue from advisory engagements, and, in many cases, we are not paid until the successful consummation of the underlying M&A transaction or restructuring. As a result, our Investment

 

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Banking revenue is highly dependent on market conditions and the decisions and actions of our clients, interested third parties and governmental authorities. For example, a client could delay or terminate an acquisition transaction because of a failure to agree upon final terms with the counterparty, failure to obtain necessary regulatory consents or board or stockholder approvals, failure to secure necessary financing, adverse market conditions or because the target’s business is experiencing unexpected operating or financial problems. Anticipated bidders for assets of a client during a restructuring transaction may not materialize or our client may not be able to restructure its operations or indebtedness due to a failure to reach agreement with its principal creditors. In these circumstances, we often do not receive any advisory fees other than the reimbursement of certain out-of-pocket expenses, despite the fact that we have devoted considerable resources to these transactions.

In Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management, our revenue includes management fees from assets we manage. These revenues are dependent upon the amount of AUM, which can decline as a result of market depreciation, withdrawals or otherwise, as well as the performance of the assets. The timing of flows, contributions and withdrawals are often out of our control, can occur on short notice, and may be inconsistent from quarter to quarter. See “— The amount and mix of our AUM are subject to significant fluctuations.” In addition, a portion of our Institutional Asset Management revenue is derived from performance fees, which vary depending on the performance of the investments we select for the funds and clients we manage, which could cause our revenue and profits to fluctuate. Even in the absence of a market downturn, below-market investment performance by our funds and portfolio managers could reduce AUM and asset management revenues.

In Private Equity, we record revenue from performance fees, or carried interest, when the returns on the private equity funds’ investments exceed certain minimum thresholds. In addition, if a fund performs poorly, we may be obligated to reverse previously recorded performance fee revenue under “claw-back” provisions. Our Private Equity revenue also includes our allocable share, based on our investments in the funds managed by our Private Equity business, of unrealized (“mark-to-market”) as well as realized gains and losses reported by such funds. As a result, because the investment returns of our Private Equity funds are uncertain and difficult to predict, the revenue we derive from our Private Equity business can be volatile from quarter to quarter and year to year.

Our failure to deal appropriately with conflicts of interest could damage our reputation and materially adversely affect our business.

As we have expanded the scope of our businesses and client base, we increasingly confront actual and potential conflicts of interest relating to our Investment Banking and Investment Management businesses. It is possible that actual, potential or perceived conflicts could give rise to client dissatisfaction, litigation or regulatory enforcement actions. Appropriately identifying and managing actual or perceived conflicts of interest is complex and difficult, and our reputation could be damaged if we fail, or appear to fail, to deal appropriately with one or more potential or actual conflicts of interest. Regulatory scrutiny of, or litigation in connection with, conflicts of interest would have a material adverse effect on our reputation which would materially adversely affect our business in a number of ways, including an inability to raise additional assets and a reluctance of potential clients and counterparties to do business with us.

Policies, controls and procedures that we may be required to implement to address additional regulatory requirements, including as a result of our Institutional Equities business and expansion into underwriting activities, or to mitigate actual or potential conflicts of interest, may result in increased costs, including for additional personnel and infrastructure and IT improvements, as well as limit our activities and reduce the positive synergies that we seek to cultivate across our businesses.

Employee misconduct, which is difficult to detect and deter, could harm us by impairing our ability to attract and retain clients and subjecting us to significant legal liability and reputational harm.

There have been a number of highly-publicized cases involving fraud or other misconduct by employees in the financial services industry, and there is a risk that our employees could engage in misconduct that adversely

affects our business. For example, our Investment Banking business often requires that we deal with confidential

 

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matters of great significance to our clients. If our employees were to improperly use or disclose confidential information provided by our clients, we could be subject to regulatory sanctions and suffer serious harm to our reputation, financial position, current client relationships and ability to attract future clients. We are also subject to a number of obligations and standards arising from our Investment Management business and our authority over the assets managed by our Investment Management business. The violation of these obligations and standards by any of our employees would adversely affect our clients and us. It is not always possible to deter employee misconduct, and the precautions we take to detect and prevent this activity may not be effective in all cases. If our employees engage in misconduct, our business would be adversely affected.

The financial services industry faces substantial litigation risks, and we may face damage to our professional reputation and legal liability if our services are not regarded as satisfactory or for other reasons.

As a financial services firm, we depend to a large extent on our relationships with our clients and our reputation for integrity and high-caliber professional services to attract and retain clients. As a result, if a client is not satisfied with our services, such dissatisfaction may be more damaging to our business than to other types of businesses. Moreover, our role as advisor to our clients on important mergers and acquisitions or restructuring transactions involves complex analysis and the exercise of professional judgment, including, if appropriate, rendering “fairness opinions” in connection with mergers and other transactions.

In recent years, the volume of claims and amount of damages claimed in litigation and regulatory proceedings against M&A financial advisors has been increasing. Our M&A advisory activities may subject us to the risk of significant legal liability to our clients and third parties, including our clients’ stockholders, under securities or other laws for materially false or misleading statements made in connection with securities and other transactions and potential liability for the fairness opinions and other advice provided to participants in corporate transactions. In addition, a portion of our M&A advisory fees are obtained from restructuring clients, and often these clients do not have sufficient resources to indemnify us for costs and expenses associated with third-party subpoenas and, to the extent claims are not barred as part of the reorganization process, direct claims. Our engagements typically include broad indemnities from our clients and provisions designed to limit our exposure to legal claims relating to our services, but these provisions may not protect us or may not be adhered to in all cases. As a result, we may incur significant legal expenses in defending against litigation. In our Investment Management business, we make investment decisions on behalf of our clients that could result in substantial losses. This also may subject us to the risk of legal liability or actions alleging negligent misconduct, breach of fiduciary duty or breach of contract. These risks often may be difficult to assess or quantify and their existence and magnitude often remain unknown for substantial periods of time. Substantial legal liability or legal expenses incurred in defending against litigation could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, operating results or liquidity or cause significant reputational harm to us, which could seriously harm our business.

Extensive and evolving regulation of our businesses exposes us to the potential for significant penalties and fines due to compliance failures, increases our costs and limits on our ability to engage in certain activities.

The financial services industry is subject to extensive regulation. We are subject to regulation by governmental and self-regulatory organizations in the jurisdictions in which we operate. Our failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations could result in adverse publicity and reputational harm as well as fines, suspensions of personnel or other sanctions, including revocation of the registration of us or any of our subsidiaries as an investment adviser or broker-dealer. Our businesses are subject to periodic examination by various regulatory authorities, and we cannot predict the outcome of any such examinations. In addition, adverse regulatory scrutiny of any of our strategic partners could have a material adverse effect on our business and reputation.

Over the last several years, global financial markets have experienced extraordinary disruption and volatility, and there have been a number of highly-publicized financial scandals involving misconduct by financial market participants and their employees. As a result, various U.S. and foreign government agencies and

 

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regulatory bodies have taken, and may take further, actions to expand laws, rules, regulations and standards that may be applicable to our activities. Our ability to conduct business and our operating results, including compliance costs, may be adversely affected as a result of any new requirements imposed by the SEC, other U.S. or foreign governmental regulatory authorities or self-regulatory organizations that regulate financial services firms or supervise financial markets. We also may be adversely affected by changes in the interpretation or enforcement of existing laws and rules by these governmental authorities and self-regulatory organizations. In addition, some of our clients or prospective clients may adopt policies that exceed regulatory requirements and impose additional restrictions. For example, certain public pension funds will not invest in funds where a placement agent or other solicitor was involved.

Our business is subject to various operational risks.

We face various operational risks related to our businesses on a day-to-day basis, particularly in our Institutional Equities, Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management businesses in which we must consistently and reliably obtain securities pricing information, process client transactions and provide reports and other customer service to our clients. Any failure to keep accurate books and records can render us liable to disciplinary action by governmental and self-regulatory authorities, as well as to claims by our clients. Our financial, accounting, compliance, trading or other data processing systems, including the systems of third parties on whom we rely, may not operate properly or may become disabled, including for reasons beyond our control. In that event, or if there are shortcomings or failures in our internal processes, people or systems, or the processes, people or systems of third parties on whom we rely, we could suffer a disruption of our business, financial losses, liability to clients, regulatory sanctions and damage to our reputation.

In addition, if we were to experience a local or regional disaster or other business continuity problem, such as a pandemic or other man-made or natural disaster, our continued success will depend, in part, on the availability of our personnel and office facilities and the proper functioning of our computer, telecommunications, transaction processing and other related systems and operations, as well as those of third parties on whom we rely. Such events could lead us to experience operational challenges, and our inability to successfully recover could materially disrupt our businesses and cause material financial loss, regulatory actions, reputational harm or legal liability.

We may not be able to generate sufficient cash to service all of our indebtedness.

Our ability to make scheduled payments on or to refinance our debt obligations depends on our financial condition and operating performance. We cannot provide assurance that we will maintain a level of cash flows from operating activities sufficient to permit us to pay the principal of, and interest on, our indebtedness, including the $120.0 million principal amount of senior unsecured notes issued to Mizuho Corporate Bank, Ltd. (“Mizuho”) due 2020 with a 5.20% coupon (the “Senior Notes”). If our cash flows and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations and our contingent obligations to fund our redeemable noncontrolling interest, we may be forced to reduce or delay investments and capital expenditures, or to sell assets, seek additional capital or restructure or refinance our indebtedness, including the Senior Notes and other contractual commitments.

Risks Related to Our Investment Banking Business

A majority of our revenue is derived from advisory assignments for Investment Banking clients, which are not long-term contracted sources of revenue and are subject to intense competition, and declines in these engagements could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operating results.

We historically have earned a substantial portion of our revenue from fees paid to us by our Investment Banking clients for advisory services. These fees are typically payable upon the successful completion of a particular transaction or restructuring. Investment Banking services accounted for 82%, 80% and 94% of Net

 

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Revenues in 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively, a substantial portion of which represents fees generated by our Advisory group. We expect that we will continue to rely on Investment Banking fees from advisory services for a substantial portion of our revenue for the foreseeable future. Accordingly, a decline in our Investment Banking advisory engagements or the market for advisory services would adversely affect our business.

In addition, our Advisory professionals operate in a highly-competitive environment where typically there are no long-term contracted sources of revenue. Each revenue-generating engagement typically is separately solicited, awarded and negotiated. In addition, many businesses do not routinely engage in transactions requiring our services. As a consequence, our fee-paying engagements with many clients are not likely to be predictable and high levels of revenue in one quarter are not necessarily predictive of continued high levels of revenue in future periods. We also lose clients each year as a result of the sale or merger of a client, a change in a client’s senior management, competition from other financial advisors and financial institutions and other causes. As a result, our advisory fees could decline materially due to such changes in the volume, nature and scope of our engagements.

A high percentage of our net revenue is derived from a small number of Investment Banking clients, and the termination of any one advisory engagement could reduce our revenue and harm our operating results.

Our top five Investment Banking clients accounted for 24%, 21% and 44% of Net Revenues in 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively. The composition of the group comprising our largest Investment Banking clients varies significantly from year to year, and a relatively small number of clients may account for a significant portion of our Investment Banking Revenues. As a result, our operating results, financial condition and liquidity may be significantly affected by even one lost mandate or the failure of one advisory assignment to be completed. No clients accounted for more than 10% of our Net Revenues for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010. For the year ended December 31, 2009, two clients accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s consolidated Net Revenues.

We face strong competition from other financial advisory firms, many of which have the ability to offer clients a wider range of products and services than we can offer, which could cause us to fail to win advisory mandates and subject us to pricing pressures that could materially adversely affect our revenue and profitability.

The financial advisory industry is intensely competitive, and we expect it to remain so. We compete on the basis of a number of factors, including the quality of our employees, transaction execution, our products and services, innovation, reputation and price. We have experienced intense competition over obtaining advisory mandates in recent years, and we may experience pricing pressures in our Investment Banking business in the future as some of our competitors seek to obtain increased market share by reducing fees.

Our Institutional Equities business relies on non-affiliated third-party service providers.

Our Institutional Equities business has entered into service agreements with third-party service providers for client order management and the execution and settlement of client securities transactions. This business faces the risk of operational failure of any of our clearing agents, the exchanges, clearing houses or other intermediaries we use to facilitate our securities transactions. Our senior management and officers oversee and manage these relationships. Poor oversight and control or inferior performance or service on the part of the service provider could result in loss of customers and violations of applicable rules and regulations. Any such failure could adversely affect our ability to effect transactions and to manage our exposure to risk.

Underwriting and trading activities expose us to risks.

We may incur losses and be subject to reputational harm to the extent that, for any reason, we are unable to sell securities we purchased as an underwriter at the anticipated price levels. As an underwriter, we also are subject to liability for material misstatements or omissions in prospectuses and other offering documents relating

to offerings we underwrite. In addition, through indemnification provisions in our agreement with our clearing

 

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organization, customer activities may expose us to off-balance-sheet credit risk. Securities may have to be purchased or sold at prevailing market prices in the event a customer fails to settle a trade on its original terms. We seek to manage the risks associated with customer trading activities through customer screening and trading procedures.

Risks Relating to Our Investment Management Business

The amount and mix of our AUM are subject to significant fluctuations.

The revenues and profitability of our Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management businesses are derived from providing investment management and related services. The level of our revenues depends largely on the level and mix of AUM. Fluctuations in the amount and mix of our AUM may be attributable in part to market conditions outside of our control that have had, and in the future could have, a negative impact on our revenues and income. Any decrease in the value or amount of our AUM because of market volatility or other factors negatively impacts our revenues and income. We are subject to an increased risk of asset volatility from changes in the global financial and equity markets. Individual financial and equity markets may be adversely affected by economic, political, financial, or other instabilities that are particular to the country or regions in which a market is located, including without limitation local acts of terrorism, economic crises or other business, social or political crises. Declines in these markets have caused in the past, and may cause in the future, a decline in our revenues and income. Global economic conditions, exacerbated by war or terrorism or financial crises, changes in the equity market place, currency exchange rates, interest rates, inflation rates, the yield curve, and other factors that are difficult to predict affect the mix, market values and levels of our AUM. A decline in the price of stocks or bonds, or in particular market segments, or in the securities market generally, could cause the value and returns on our AUM to decline, resulting in a decline in our revenues and income. Moreover, changing market conditions may cause a shift in our asset mix between international and U.S. assets, potentially resulting in a decline in our revenue and income depending upon the nature of our AUM and the level of management fees we earn based on them. Additionally, changing market conditions may cause a shift in our asset mix towards fixed-income products and a related decline in our revenue and income, as in the U.S. we generally derive higher fee revenues and income from equity assets than from fixed-income products we manage.

If the investments we make on behalf of our funds and clients perform poorly, we will suffer a decline in our investment management revenue and earnings, and our Investment Management business may be adversely affected.

Revenue from our Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management businesses is derived from fees earned for our management of client assets, generally based on the market value of AUM. Poor investment performance by these businesses, on an absolute basis or as compared to third-party benchmarks or competitors, could stimulate higher redemptions, thereby lowering AUM and reducing the fees we earn, even in periods when securities prices are generally rising. In addition, if the investments we make on behalf of our funds and clients perform poorly, it may be more difficult for us to attract new investors, launch new products or offer new services in our Institutional Asset Management or Wealth Management businesses. In our Private Equity business, our revenues include management fees based on committed or invested capital and performance fees. If our private equity investments perform poorly, whether on a realized or unrealized basis, our revenues and earnings will suffer. Poor performance by our private equity investments may also make it more difficult for us to raise any new funds in the future, may result in such fundraising taking longer to complete than anticipated or may prevent us from raising such funds. In addition, to the extent that, over the life of the funds, we have received an amount of carried interest that exceeds a specified percentage of distributions made to the third-party investors in our funds, we may be obligated to repay the amount of this excess to the third-party investors.

Our Investment Management business’ reliance on non-affiliated third-party service providers subjects the Company to operational risks.

We have entered into services agreements with third-party service providers for custodial services and trust and investment administration processing and reporting services. Our officers oversee and manage these relationships; however, poor oversight and control on our part or inferior performance or service on the part of

 

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the service providers could result in loss of customers, violation of applicable rules and regulations, including, but not limited to, privacy and anti-money laundering laws and otherwise adversely affect our business and operations.

Our agreements with the OCC require us to maintain and segregate certain assets, and our failure to comply with these agreements (including if we are required to access these assets for other purposes) could adversely affect us.

In connection with the organization of ETC, the OCC required the Company and Evercore LP to enter into a Capital and Liquidity Support Agreement, a Capital and Liquidity Maintenance Agreement and other related agreements (collectively, the “OCC Agreements”). The OCC Agreements require the Company’s and Evercore LP’s continuing obligation to provide ETC necessary capital and liquidity support in order to ensure that ETC continues to operate safely and soundly and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations. In particular, the OCC Agreements require that the Company and Evercore LP (1) maintain at least $5 million in Tier 1 capital in ETC or such other amount as the OCC may require, (2) maintain liquid assets in ETC in an amount at least equal to the greater of $3.5 million or 90 days coverage of ETC’s operating expenses and (3) provide at least $10 million of certain collateral held in a segregated account at a third-party depository institution.

If we fail to comply with any of the OCC Agreements, we could become subject to civil money penalties, regulatory enforcement actions, payment of damages and, if the OCC deems it likely that we are unable to fulfill our obligations or breach the OCC Agreements, a forced disposition of ETC. The occurrence of any of these events or the disclosure that these events are probable or under consideration may cause reputational harm and erosion of client trust, due to a perception that we are unable to comply with applicable regulatory requirements, unable to successfully launch new initiatives and businesses, or that our reputation for integrity and high-caliber professional services is no longer valid, any of which could adversely affect our business and operations.

Valuation methodologies for certain assets in our private equity funds can be subject to significant subjectivity, and the values of assets established pursuant to such methodologies may never be realized, which could result in significant losses for our funds.

We have made principal investments in ECP II, Evercore Mexico Capital Partners II (“EMCP II”), Discovery Americas I L.P., CITIC Securities International Partners, LTD and a private equity fund managed by Trilantic. These funds generally invest in relatively high-risk, illiquid assets. In addition, some of these investments are, or may in the future be, in industries or sectors which are unstable, in distress or undergoing some uncertainty. Such investments may be subject to rapid changes in value caused by sudden company-specific or industry-wide developments. Contributing capital to these funds is risky, and we may lose some or all of the principal amount of our investments. There are no regularly quoted market prices for a number of investments in our funds. The value of the investments of our funds is determined using fair value methodologies described in the funds’ valuation policies, which may consider, among other things, the nature of the investment, the expected cash flows from the investment, bid or ask prices provided by third parties for the investment and the trading price of recent sales of securities (in the case of publicly-traded securities), restrictions on transfer and other recognized valuation methodologies. The methodologies we use in valuing individual investments are based on estimates and assumptions specific to the particular investments. Therefore, the value of our investments does not necessarily reflect the prices that would actually be obtained by us on behalf of the fund when such investments are sold. Realizations at values significantly lower than the values at which investments have been reflected in fund values would result in losses for the applicable fund and the loss of potential incentive income and principal investments.

The limited partners of the private equity funds we manage may terminate their relationship with us at any time.

The limited partnership agreements of the funds we manage provide that the limited partners of each fund may terminate their relationship with us without cause with a simple majority vote of each fund’s limited partners. If the limited partners of the funds we manage terminate their relationship with us, we would lose fees earned for our management of the funds and carried interest from those funds.

 

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Risks Related to Our International Operations

A portion of our revenues are derived from our international operations, which are subject to certain risks.

In 2011, we earned 27% of our Total Revenues, excluding Other Revenue, from clients and private equity funds located outside of the United States. We intend to grow our non-U.S. business, and this growth is critical to our overall success. In addition, many of our larger clients for our Investment Banking business are non-U.S. entities seeking to enter into transactions involving U.S. businesses. See “—Difficult market conditions may adversely affect our business in many ways, including reducing the volume of the transactions involving our Investment Banking business and reducing the value of the assets we manage in our Investment Management businesses, which, in each case, may materially reduce our revenue or income.”

Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could adversely affect our results of operations.

Because our financial statements are denominated in U.S. dollars and we receive a portion of our net revenue from continuing operations in other currencies, predominantly in Mexican pesos, Euros, British pounds, Brazilian real and Hong Kong dollars, we are exposed to fluctuations in foreign currencies. In addition, we pay certain of our expenses in such currencies. We have not entered into any transactions to hedge our exposure to these foreign exchange fluctuations through the use of derivative instruments or otherwise. An appreciation or depreciation of any of these currencies relative to the U.S. dollar would result in an adverse or beneficial impact, respectively, to our financial results.

Adverse economic conditions and political events in Mexico may result in disruptions to Protego’s business operations and adversely affect its revenue.

Protego is a Mexican company, with all of its assets located in Mexico and most of its revenue derived from operations in Mexico. As a financial services firm, Protego’s businesses are materially affected by Mexico’s financial markets and economic conditions. For example, for our PCB business, a lack of liquidity in Mexican government bonds could have a material adverse effect on PCB’s business. Historically, interest rates in Mexico have been volatile, particularly in times of economic unrest and uncertainty. Mexico has had, and may continue to have, high real and nominal interest rates. In addition, because the Mexican government exercises significant influence over many aspects of the Mexican economy, political events in Mexico, including a change in state and municipal political leadership, may result in disruptions to Protego’s business operations and adversely affect its revenue. Any action by the government, including changes in the regulation of Mexico’s financial sector, could have an adverse effect on the operations of Protego, especially on its asset management business.

Protego derives a significant portion of its revenue from advisory contracts with state and local governments in Mexico. The term limit system in Mexico may prevent Protego from maintaining relationships with the same clients in the same political positions beyond these periods. After an election takes place, there is no guarantee that Protego will be able to remain as advisors of the new government, even if the new administration is of the same political party as the previous one.

The cost of compliance with international broker dealer, employment, labor, benefits and tax regulations may adversely affect our business and hamper our ability to expand internationally.

Since we operate our business both in the United States and internationally, we are subject to many distinct broker dealer, employment, labor, benefits and tax laws in each country in which we operate, including regulations affecting our employment practices and our relations with our employees and service providers. If we are required to comply with new regulations or new interpretations of existing regulations, or if we are unable to comply with these regulations or interpretations, our business could be adversely affected or the cost of compliance may make it difficult to expand into new international markets. Additionally, our competitiveness in international markets may be adversely affected by regulations requiring, among other things, the awarding of contracts to local contractors, the employment of local citizens and/or the purchase of services from local businesses or that favor or require local ownership.

 

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Risks Related to Our Organizational Structure

We are required to pay some of our Senior Managing Directors for most of the benefits relating to any additional tax depreciation or amortization deductions we may claim as a result of the tax basis step-up we received in connection with exchanges of Evercore LP partnership units (“LP Units”) for shares and related transactions.

As of December 31, 2011, there were 7,818,163 vested and 2,995,529 unvested LP Units held by some of our Senior Managing Directors that may in the future be exchanged for shares of our Class A common stock. The exchanges may result in increases in the tax basis of the assets of Evercore LP that otherwise would not have been available. These increases in tax basis may reduce the amount of tax that we would otherwise be required to pay in the future, although the IRS may challenge all or part of that tax basis increase, and a court could sustain such a challenge.

We have entered into a tax receivable agreement with some of our Senior Managing Directors that provides for the payment by us to these Senior Managing Directors of 85% of the amount of cash savings, if any, in U.S. federal, state and local income tax or franchise tax that we actually realize as a result of these increases in tax basis. While the actual increase in tax basis, as well as the amount and timing of any payments under this agreement, will vary depending upon a number of factors, including the timing of exchanges, the price of shares of our Class A common stock at the time of the exchange, the extent to which such exchanges are taxable, and the amount and timing of our income, we expect that, as a result of the size of the increases in the tax basis of the tangible and intangible assets of Evercore LP attributable to our interest in Evercore LP, during the expected term of the tax receivable agreement, the payments that we may make to our Senior Managing Directors could be substantial.

Although we are not aware of any issue that would cause the IRS to challenge a tax basis increase, Senior Managing Directors who receive payments will not reimburse us for any payments that may previously have been made under the tax receivable agreement. As a result, in certain circumstances we could make payments to some of the Senior Managing Directors under the tax receivable agreement in excess of our cash tax savings. Our ability to achieve benefits from any tax basis increase, and the payments to be made under this agreement, will depend upon a number of factors, as discussed above, including the timing and amount of our future income.

Our only material asset is our interest in Evercore LP, and we are accordingly dependent upon distributions from Evercore LP to pay dividends and taxes and other expenses.

Evercore Partners Inc. is a holding company and has no material assets other than its ownership of partnership units in Evercore LP. Evercore Partners Inc. has no independent means of generating revenue. We intend to cause Evercore LP to make distributions to its partners in an amount sufficient to cover all applicable taxes payable and dividends, if any, declared by us. To the extent that Evercore Partners Inc. needs funds, and Evercore LP is restricted from making such distributions under applicable law or regulation, or is otherwise unable to provide such funds, it could materially adversely affect our operating results, financial condition and liquidity.

If Evercore Partners Inc. were deemed an “investment company” under the 1940 Act as a result of its ownership of Evercore LP, applicable restrictions could make it impractical for us to continue our business as contemplated and could have a material adverse effect on our business.

If Evercore Partners Inc. were to cease participation in the management of Evercore LP, its interest in Evercore LP could be deemed an “investment security” for purposes of the 1940 Act. Generally, a person is deemed to be an “investment company” if it owns investment securities having a value exceeding 40% of the value of its total assets (exclusive of U.S. government securities and cash items), absent an applicable exemption. Evercore Partners Inc. will have no material assets other than its equity interest in Evercore LP. A determination that this interest was an investment security could result in Evercore Partners Inc. being an investment company under the 1940 Act and becoming subject to the registration and other requirements of the 1940 Act.

 

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The 1940 Act and the rules thereunder contain detailed parameters for the organization and operations of investment companies. Among other things, the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder limit or prohibit transactions with affiliates, impose limitations on the issuance of debt and equity securities, prohibit the issuance of stock options, and impose certain governance requirements. We intend to conduct our operations so that Evercore Partners Inc. will not be deemed to be an investment company under the 1940 Act. However, if anything were to happen which would cause Evercore Partners Inc. to be deemed to be an investment company under the 1940 Act, requirements imposed by the 1940 Act, including limitations on our capital structure, ability to transact business with affiliates and ability to compensate key employees, could make it impractical for us to continue our business as currently conducted, impair the agreements and arrangements between and among Evercore Partners Inc., Evercore LP or our Senior Managing Directors, or any combination thereof and materially adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Certain of our affiliates operate with relative autonomy, which limits our ability to alter their management practices and policies.

Although we are represented on the management committees of G5, ABS and Pan, we are not able to exercise significant operational control over these affiliates and are not directly involved in managing their day-to-day activities, including investment management policies and procedures, fee levels, marketing and product development and client relationships. Moreover, the founders of these affiliates have certain protective and participating rights, including the ability to block certain major corporate actions and approval of the annual budget and compensation arrangements. In addition, while we control the management committee of Atalanta Sosnoff, responsibility for its day-to-day operations is vested with the management of Atalanta Sosnoff, including managing client relationships and making discretionary investment decisions. As a consequence, our reputation, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected by problems arising from the day-to-day operations of one of these businesses, or from other matters regarding one of these businesses over which we cannot exercise control. Future acquisitions of, and investments in, investment management or investment banking businesses may be structured in a similar manner.

Risks Related to Our Class A Common Stock

Our Senior Managing Directors control a significant portion of the voting power in Evercore Partners Inc., which may give rise to conflicts of interests.

Our Senior Managing Directors own shares of our Class A common stock and our Class B common stock. Our certificate of incorporation provides that the holders of the shares of our Class B common stock are entitled to a number of votes that is determined pursuant to a formula that relates to the number of LP Units held by such holders. Each holder of Class B common stock is entitled, without regard to the number of shares of Class B common stock held by such holder, to one vote for each partnership unit in Evercore LP held by such holder. Our Senior Managing Directors, and certain trusts benefiting their families, collectively have 25% of the voting power in Evercore Partners Inc. As a result, our Senior Managing Directors have the ability to exercise significant influence over the election of the members of our board of directors and, therefore, significant influence over our management and affairs, including determinations with respect to acquisitions, dispositions, borrowings, issuances of common stock or other securities, and the declaration and payment of dividends. In addition, they are able to exercise significant influence over the outcome of all matters requiring stockholder approval. This concentration of ownership could deprive our Class A stockholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their common stock as part of a sale of our company and might ultimately affect the market price of our Class A common stock.

Our share price may decline due to the large number of shares eligible for future sale and for exchange.

The market price of our Class A common stock could decline as a result of sales of a large number of shares of Class A common stock in the market or the perception that such sales could occur. These sales, or the possibility that these sales may occur, also might make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities in the future at a time and at a price that we deem appropriate.

 

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On August 21, 2008, we entered into a Purchase Agreement with Mizuho pursuant to which Mizuho purchased from us Senior Notes along with warrants to purchase 5,454,545 shares of Evercore Class A common stock at $22.00 per share (the “Warrants”) expiring in 2020.

At December 31, 2011, we had a total of 27,941,307 shares of our Class A common stock outstanding. In addition, our Senior Managing Directors own an aggregate of 10,813,692 partnership units in Evercore LP, of which 7,818,163 partnership units were fully vested and 2,995,529 partnership units were unvested. Our amended and restated certificate of incorporation allows the exchange of partnership units in Evercore LP (other than those held by us) for shares of our Class A common stock on a one-for-one basis, subject to customary conversion rate adjustments for stock splits, stock dividends and reclassifications. The shares of Class A common stock issuable upon exchange of the partnership units that are held by our Senior Managing Directors are eligible for resale from time to time, subject to certain contractual and Securities Act restrictions. Also, as of December 31, 2011, 5,958,668 restricted stock units (“RSUs”) issued pursuant to the Evercore Partners Inc. 2006 Stock Incentive Plan were outstanding. Of these RSUs, 563,417 were fully vested and 5,395,251 were unvested. We also had 1,911,511 restricted shares of Class A common stock outstanding at December 31, 2011 as partial consideration for the Lexicon acquisition.

Some of our Senior Managing Directors are parties to registration rights agreements with us. Under these agreements, these persons have the ability to cause us to register the shares of our Class A common stock they could acquire.

The market price of our Class A common stock may be volatile, which could cause the value of our Class A common stock to decline.

Securities markets worldwide experience significant price and volume fluctuations. This market volatility, as well as general economic, market or political conditions, could reduce the market price of our Class A common stock in spite of our operating performance. In addition, our operating results could be below the expectations of public market analysts and investors, and in response, the market price of our Class A common stock could decrease significantly.

Anti-takeover provisions in our charter documents and Delaware law could delay or prevent a change in control.

Our certificate of incorporation and by-laws may delay or prevent a merger or acquisition that a stockholder may consider favorable by permitting our board of directors to issue one or more series of preferred stock, requiring advance notice for stockholder proposals and nominations and placing limitations on convening stockholder meetings. In addition, we are subject to provisions of the Delaware General Corporation Law that restrict certain business combinations with interested stockholders. These provisions may also discourage acquisition proposals or delay or prevent a change in control, which could harm our stock price.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None

 

Item 2. Properties

Our principal offices are located in leased office space at 55 East 52nd Street, New York, New York, at Blvd. Manuel A. Camacho 36-22, Col. Lomas de Chapultepec in Mexico City, Mexico and at 1 Paternoster Square in London, UK. We do not own any real property.

 

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Item 3. Legal Proceedings

General

In the normal course of business, from time to time the Company and its affiliates may be involved in judicial or regulatory proceedings or arbitration concerning matters arising in connection with the conduct of its businesses, and, in the past, the Company and its affiliates have been involved in civil litigation matters. In addition, Mexican, United Kingdom, Hong Kong and United States government agencies and self-regulatory organizations, as well as state securities commissions in the United States, conduct periodic examinations and initiate administrative proceedings regarding the Company’s business, including, among other matters, accounting and operational matters, that can result in censure, fine, the issuance of cease-and-desist orders or the suspension or expulsion of a broker-dealer, investment advisor, or its directors, officers or employees. In view of the inherent difficulty of predicting the outcome of such matters, particularly in cases where claimants seek substantial or indeterminate damages or where investigations and proceedings are in the early stages, the Company cannot predict the loss or range of loss, if any, related to such matters, how or if such matters will be resolved, when they will ultimately be resolved, or what the eventual settlement, fine, penalty or other relief, if any, might be. Subject to the foregoing, the Company believes, based on current knowledge and after consultation with counsel, that it is not currently party to any material pending legal proceedings, individually or in the aggregate, the resolution of which would have a material effect on the Company. Legal reserves are established in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 450, “Accounting for Contingencies” when warranted. Once established, reserves are adjusted when there is more information available or when an event occurs requiring a change.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable

 

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PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Price Range of Evercore Class A Common Stock

Our Class A common stock is listed on the NYSE and is traded under the symbol “EVR.” At the close of business on February 21, 2012, there were 24 Class A common stockholders of record.

The following table sets forth for the periods indicated the high and low reported sale prices per share for the Class A common stock, as reported on the NYSE:

 

     2011      2010  
     High      Low      High      Low  

First Quarter

   $ 35.87       $ 30.17       $ 34.42       $ 27.34   

Second Quarter

   $ 37.26       $ 32.05       $ 38.23       $ 23.15   

Third Quarter

   $ 33.88       $ 19.96       $ 30.00       $ 21.02   

Fourth Quarter

   $ 29.33       $ 20.29       $ 35.05       $ 27.07   

There is no trading market for the Evercore Partners Inc. Class B common stock. As of February 21, 2012, there were 47 holders of record of the Class B common stock.

Dividend Policy

The Company paid quarterly cash dividends of $0.20 per share of Class A common stock for the quarter ended December 31, 2011, $0.18 per share for the quarters ended September 30, 2011, June 30, 2011, March 31, 2011 and December 31, 2010, and $0.15 per share of Class A common stock for the quarters ended September 30, 2010, June 30, 2010, March 31, 2010.

We pay dividend equivalents, in the form of unvested RSU awards, concurrently with the payment of dividends to the holders of Class A common shares, on all unvested RSU grants awarded in conjunction with annual bonuses as well as awards issued in conjunction with the acquisition of Lexicon. The dividend equivalents have the same vesting and delivery terms as the underlying RSU award.

The declaration and payment of any future dividends will be at the sole discretion of our board of directors. Our board of directors will take into account: general economic and business conditions; our financial condition and operating results; our available cash and current and anticipated cash needs; capital requirements; contractual, legal, tax and regulatory restrictions and implications on the payment of dividends by us to our stockholders or by our subsidiaries (including Evercore LP) to us; and such other factors as our board of directors may deem relevant.

We are a holding company and have no material assets other than our ownership of partnership units in Evercore LP. We intend to cause Evercore LP to make distributions to us in an amount sufficient to cover dividends, if any, declared by us. If Evercore LP makes such distributions, the limited partners of Evercore LP will be entitled to receive equivalent distributions from Evercore LP on their vested partnership units.

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

None

 

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Share Repurchases for the period October 1, 2011 through December 31, 2011

 

2011

   Total Number  of
Shares (or Units)
Purchased(1)
     Average Price
Paid Per Share
     Total Number  of
Shares (or Units)
Purchased as Part of

Publicly Announced
Plans or Programs(2)
     Maximum Number  (or
Approximate Dollar Value)
of Shares (or Units) that May
Yet Be Purchased Under the
Plan or Program(2)
 

October 1 to October 31

     51,000       $ 27.04         —         $ 85,000,000   

November 1 to November 30

     12,543         25.04         —           85,000,000   

December 1 to December 31

     301,989         27.54         —           85,000,000   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     365,532       $ 27.39         —         $ 85,000,000   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1) These reflect treasury transactions arising from net settlement of equity awards to satisfy minimum tax obligations.

 

(2) In October 2010, Evercore’s Board authorized the repurchase of up to 2 million shares of Evercore Class A Common Stock and/or LP Units for up to $85.0 million. Under this share repurchase program, shares may be repurchased from time to time in open market transactions, in privately negotiated transactions or otherwise. The timing and the actual number of shares repurchased will depend on a variety of factors, including legal requirements, price and economic and market conditions. This program may be suspended or discontinued at any time and does not have a specified expiration date.

 

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data

The following table sets forth the historical selected financial data for the Company for all periods presented. For more information on our historical financial information, see Item 7 “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and Item 8 “Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.” During 2011, certain balances for prior periods were reclassified to conform to their current presentation.

 

     2011     2010     2009     2008     2007  
     (dollars in thousands, except per share data)  

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS DATA

          

Revenues

          

Investment Banking Revenue

   $ 430,597      $ 301,931      $ 293,311      $ 181,608      $ 295,751   

Investment Management Revenue

     99,161        74,610        21,164        9,811        20,158   

Other Revenue

     13,897        22,205        22,211        33,885        24,141   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Revenues

     543,655        398,746        336,686        225,304        340,050   

Interest Expense

     19,391        22,841        24,269        30,278        18,451   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Revenues

     524,264        375,905        312,417        195,026        321,599   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Expenses

          

Operating Expenses

     427,155        316,016        256,632        188,975        235,502   

Other Expenses

     61,297        23,029        32,337        15,064        141,032   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Expenses

     488,452        339,045        288,969        204,039        376,534   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (Loss) before Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments and Income Taxes

     35,812        36,860        23,448        (9,013     (54,935

Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments

     919        (557     (1,406     (371     —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income (Loss) before Income Taxes

     36,731        36,303        22,042        (9,384     (54,935

Provision for Income Taxes

     22,724        16,177        19,679        179        12,401   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) from Continuing Operations

     14,007        20,126        2,363        (9,563     (67,336

Net Income (Loss) from Discontinued Operations

     (966     (517     (424     —          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss)

     13,041        19,609        1,939        (9,563     (67,336

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Noncontrolling Interest

     6,089        10,655        3,509        (4,850     (32,841
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.

   $ 6,952      $ 8,954      $ (1,570   $ (4,713   $ (34,495
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Dividends Declared per Share

   $ 0.74      $ 0.63      $ 0.51      $ 0.48      $ 0.41   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted Net Income (Loss) per Share Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc. Common Shareholders:

          

From Continuing Operations

   $ 0.27      $ 0.41      $ (0.07   $ (0.36   $ (3.38

From Discontinued Operations

     (0.04     (0.02     (0.03     —          —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.

   $ 0.23      $ 0.39      $ (0.10   $ (0.36   $ (3.38
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL CONDITION DATA

          

Total Assets

   $ 1,043,592      $ 898,085      $ 891,160      $ 738,940      $ 689,096   

Long-term Liabilities

   $ 252,602      $ 218,465      $ 179,113      $ 141,980      $ 50,205   

Total Long-term Debt

   $ 99,664      $ 98,082      $ 96,618      $ 95,263      $ —     

Total Liabilities

   $ 555,499      $ 505,438      $ 595,404      $ 507,355      $ 469,781   

Noncontrolling Interest

   $ 80,429      $ 91,948      $ 29,361      $ 15,978      $ 46,699   

Total Equity

   $ 465,826      $ 367,241      $ 295,756      $ 231,585      $ 219,315   

 

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with Evercore Partners Inc.’s consolidated financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this Form 10-K.

Key Financial Measures

Revenue

Total revenues reflect revenues from our Investment Banking and Investment Management business segments that include fees for services, transaction-related client reimbursements plus other revenue. Net revenues reflect total revenues less interest expense related to repurchase agreements and the Senior Notes.

Investment Banking. Our Investment Banking business earns fees from our clients for providing advice on mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, leveraged buyouts, restructurings and similar corporate finance matters, and from underwriting and private placement activities, as well as commissions from our sales and trading activities. The amount and timing of the fees paid vary by the type of engagement. In general, advisory fees are paid at the time we sign an engagement letter, during the course of the engagement or when an engagement is completed. The majority of our investment banking revenue consists of advisory fees that are dependent on the successful completion of a transaction. A transaction can fail to be completed for many reasons, including failure of parties to agree upon final terms with the counterparty, to secure necessary board or shareholder approvals, to secure necessary financing or to achieve necessary regulatory approvals. In the case of bankruptcy engagements, fees are subject to approval of the court. Underwriting revenues are recognized when the offering has been deemed to be completed, placement fees are generally recognized at the time of the client’s acceptance of capital or capital commitments and commissions are recorded on a trade-date basis or, in the case of payments under commission sharing arrangements, on the date earned.

Revenue trends in our advisory business generally are correlated to the volume of M&A activity and/or restructuring activity, which tends to be counter-cyclical to M&A. However, deviations from this trend can occur in any given year or quarter for a number of reasons. For example, changes in our market share or the ability of our clients to close certain large transactions can cause our revenue results to diverge from the level of overall M&A or restructuring activity.

Investment Management. Our Investment Management business includes operations related to the management of the Institutional Asset Management, Wealth Management and Private Equity businesses. Revenue sources primarily include management fees, which include fees earned from portfolio companies, fiduciary and consulting fees, performance fees (including carried interest) and gains (or losses) on our investments.

Management fees for third party clients generally represent a percentage of AUM. Fiduciary and consulting fees, which are generally a function of the size and complexity of each engagement, are individually negotiated. Management fees from private equity operations are generally a percentage of committed capital or invested capital at rates agreed with the investment funds we manage or with the individual client. Performance fees from private equity funds are earned when specified benchmarks are exceeded. In certain circumstances, such fees are subject to “claw-back” provisions. Portfolio company fees include monitoring, director and transaction fees associated with services provided to the portfolio companies of the private equity funds we manage. Gains and losses include both realized and unrealized gains and losses on principal investments, including those arising from our equity interest in investment partnerships.

Transaction-Related Client Reimbursements. In both our Investment Banking and Investment Management segments, we make various transaction-related expenditures, such as travel and professional fees, on behalf of our clients. Pursuant to the engagement letters with our advisory clients or the contracts with the limited partners in the private equity funds we manage, these expenditures may be reimbursable. We define these expenses as

 

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transaction-related expenses and record such expenditures as incurred and record revenue when it is determined that clients have an obligation to reimburse us for such transaction-related expenses. Client expense reimbursements are recorded as revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations on the later of the date an engagement letter is executed or the date we pay or accrue the expense.

Other Revenue and Interest Expense. Other Revenue and Interest Expense is derived primarily from investing customer funds in financing transactions. These transactions are principally repurchases and resales of Mexican government and government agency securities. Revenue and expenses associated with these transactions are recognized over the term of the repurchase or resale transaction. Other Revenue includes income earned on marketable securities, cash and cash equivalents and assets segregated for regulatory purposes. Interest Expense includes interest expense associated with the Senior Notes.

Operating Expenses

Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense. We include all payments for services rendered by our employees, as well as profits interests in our businesses that have been accounted for as compensation, in employee compensation and benefits expense.

We maintain compensation programs, including base salary, cash, deferred cash and equity bonus awards and benefits programs and manage compensation to estimates of competitive levels based on market conditions. Our level of compensation reflects our plan to maintain competitive compensation levels to retain key personnel, and it reflects the impact of newly-hired senior professionals, including related grants of equity awards which are generally valued at their grant date.

Increasing the number of high-caliber, experienced senior level employees is critical to our growth efforts. In our advisory businesses, these hires generally do not begin to generate significant revenue in the year they are hired.

Our annual compensation program includes share-based compensation awards and deferred cash awards as a component of the annual bonus awards for certain employees. These awards are generally subject to annual vesting requirements over a four-year period beginning at the date of grant, which generally occurs in the first quarter of each year; accordingly, the expense is amortized over the stated vesting period. With respect to the annual awards granted in February 2012, the Company adopted new retirement eligibility terms, which stipulate that if an employee has at least five years of continuous service, is at least 55 years of age and has a combined age and years of service of at least 65 years, the employee is eligible for retirement (prior year’s awards required combined years of service and age of at least 70 years). Retirement eligibility allows for continued vesting of awards after employees depart from the Company, provided they give at least one year of advance notice. As a consequence of these changes, a larger number of employees are or will become retirement eligible prior to the vesting date and the requisite service period over which we will expense the award will be shorter than the stated vesting period.

Non-Compensation Expenses. The balance of our operating expenses includes costs for occupancy and equipment rental, professional fees, travel and related expenses, communications and information technology services, depreciation and amortization, acquisition and transition costs and other operating expenses. We refer to all of these expenses as non-compensation expenses.

Other Expenses

Other Expenses include: a) amortization costs associated with the modification of unvested LP Units and certain other awards, b) charges associated with the vesting of Event-based Awards, c) the amortization of intangible assets associated with certain acquisitions, d) compensation charges associated with deferred consideration, retention awards and related compensation for Lexicon employees, and e) other charges related to the Lexicon acquisition, including the exiting of a lease commitment for office space, an introducing fee as well as other professional fees incurred by Lexicon.

 

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Income from Equity Method Investments

Our share of the income (loss) from our equity interests in Pan, G5 and ABS are included within Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments, as a component of Income Before Income Taxes, on the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Provision for Income Taxes

We account for income taxes in accordance with ASC 740, “Accounting for Income Taxes” (“ASC 740”), which requires the recognition of tax benefits or expenses on temporary differences between the financial reporting and tax basis of our assets and liabilities.

Discontinued Operations

In October 2011, EAM announced its plan to wind down its business. EAM’s management and the Company made this decision because EAM was unable to attain sufficient scale to be a viable business due to several factors, including the ongoing effects of the financial crisis. The wind down of EAM’s business was completed by December 31, 2011. Accordingly, the historical results of EAM have been included within Discontinued Operations on the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Noncontrolling Interest

We record noncontrolling interest relating to the ownership interests of our current and former Senior Managing Directors, their estate planning vehicles and Trilantic in Evercore LP, as well as the portions of our operating subsidiaries not owned by Evercore. As described in Note 15 to our consolidated financial statements herein, Evercore Partners Inc. is the sole general partner of Evercore LP and has a majority economic interest in Evercore LP. As a result, Evercore Partners Inc. consolidates Evercore LP and records a noncontrolling interest for the economic interest in Evercore LP held by the limited partners.

We generally allocate net income or loss to noncontrolling interests held at Evercore LP and at the operating entity level, where required, by multiplying the vested equity ownership percentage of the noncontrolling interest holders for the period by the net income or loss of the entity to which the noncontrolling interest relates. In circumstances where the governing documents of the entity to which the noncontrolling interest relates require special allocations of profits or losses to the controlling and noncontrolling interest holders, then the net income or loss of these entities will be allocated based on these special allocations.

 

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Results of Operations

The following is a discussion of our results of operations from continuing operations for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009. For a more detailed discussion of the factors that affected the revenue and operating expenses of our Investment Banking and Investment Management business segments in these periods, see the discussion in “Business Segments” below.

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,     Change  
     2011     2010     2009     2011 v. 2010     2010 v. 2009  
     (dollars in thousands, except per share data)  

Revenues

          

Investment Banking Revenue

   $ 430,597      $ 301,931      $ 293,311        43     3

Investment Management Revenue

     99,161        74,610        21,164        33     253

Other Revenue

     13,897        22,205        22,211        (37 %)     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Total Revenues

     543,655        398,746        336,686        36     18

Interest Expense

     19,391        22,841        24,269        (15 %)      (6 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Net Revenues

     524,264        375,905        312,417        39     20
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Expenses

          

Operating Expenses

     427,155        316,016        256,632        35     23

Other Expenses

     61,297        23,029        32,337        166     (29 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Total Expenses

     488,452        339,045        288,969        44     17
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Income Before Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments and Income Taxes

     35,812        36,860        23,448        (3 %)      57

Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments

     919        (557     (1,406     NM        60
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Income Before Income Taxes

     36,731        36,303        22,042        1     65

Provision for Income Taxes

     22,724        16,177        19,679        40     (18 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Net Income from Continuing Operations

     14,007        20,126        2,363        (30 %)      752
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Discontinued Operations

          

Income (Loss) from Discontinued Operations

     (4,198     (2,618     (2,264     (60 %)      (16 %) 

Provision (Benefit) for Income Taxes

     (722     (297     (147     (143 %)      (102 %) 

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Noncontrolling Interest

     (2,510     (1,804     (1,693     (39 %)      (7 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Net Income (Loss) from Discontinued Operations

     (966     (517     (424     (87 %)      (22 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Net Income

     13,041        19,609        1,939        (33 %)      911

Net Income Attributable to Noncontrolling Interest

     6,089        10,655        3,509        (43 %)      204
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.

   $ 6,952      $ 8,954      $ (1,570     (22 %)      NM   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Diluted Net Income (Loss) Per Share Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc. Common Shareholders:

          

From Continuing Operations

   $ 0.27      $ 0.41      $ (0.07     (34 %)      NM   

From Discontinued Operations

     (0.04     (0.02     (0.03     (100 %)      33
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.

   $ 0.23      $ 0.39      $ (0.10     (41 %)      NM   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

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2011 versus 2010

Net revenues were $524.3 million in 2011, an increase of $148.4 million, or 39%, versus net revenues of $375.9 million in 2010. Investment Banking Revenue and Investment Management Revenue increased 43% and 33%, respectively, compared to 2010. See the segment discussion below for further information. Net revenues include interest expense on our Senior Notes.

Total Operating Expenses were $427.2 million in 2011 as compared to $316.0 million in 2010, a 35% increase. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $308.0 million in 2011, an increase of $81.1 million, or 36%, versus expense of $226.9 million in 2010. The increase was primarily due to increased compensation costs resulting from the expansion of existing businesses and our new businesses, some of which were not in operation during all of 2010. Non-compensation expenses as a component of Operating Expenses were $119.2 million in 2011, an increase of $30.1 million, or 34%, over non-compensation operating expenses of $89.1 million in 2010. Non-compensation operating expenses increased compared to 2010 primarily as a result of the expansion of our new and existing businesses, as well as additional costs from our acquisition of Lexicon.

Total Other Expenses of $61.3 million in 2011 related to compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $24.2 million, vesting of Event-based Awards of $11.4 million, acquisition related compensation costs of $14.6 million, special charges of $3.9 million and amortization of intangibles of $7.2 million. Total Other Expenses of $23.0 million in 2010 related to compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $20.8 million and amortization of intangibles of $2.2 million.

Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense as a percentage of Net Revenues was 68% for the year ended December 31, 2011, compared to 66% for the year ended December 31, 2010. The increase was primarily attributable to increased compensation expense associated with the amortization of unvested LP Units and certain other awards, the effect of new businesses as well as additional costs from our acquisition of Lexicon, offset by higher revenues. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense was also impacted by the vesting of Event-based Awards, which occurred in conjunction with our offering during the second quarter of 2011.

The provision for income taxes in 2011 was $22.7 million, which reflected an effective tax rate of 62%. The provision was impacted by the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards, which are not deductible for income tax purposes, as well as the noncontrolling interest associated with LP Units. The provision for income taxes in 2010 was $16.2 million, which reflected an effective tax rate of 45%. The 2010 provision was impacted by the non-deductible compensation expense associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards, as well as losses in certain foreign jurisdictions for which no foreign income tax benefits are anticipated.

Income (loss) from equity method investments was $0.9 million for 2011, as compared to ($0.6) million for 2010. The increase was primarily due to our investment in G5, which the Company made in the fourth quarter of 2010.

Noncontrolling interest was $6.1 million in 2011 compared to $10.7 million for 2010.

2010 versus 2009

Net revenues were $375.9 million in 2010, an increase of $63.5 million, or 20%, versus net revenues of $312.4 million in 2009. Investment Banking Revenue and Investment Management Revenue increased 3% and 253%, respectively, compared to 2009. See the segment discussion below for further information. Net revenues include interest expense on our Senior Notes.

Total Operating Expenses were $316.0 million in 2010 as compared to $256.6 million in 2009, a 23% increase. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $226.9 million in 2010, an increase of $28.7 million, or 14%, versus expense of $198.2 million in 2009. The increase was primarily due to compensation costs resulting from the expansion of existing businesses and our new

 

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businesses, all of which were either not consolidated, or in operation, during the entire year ended 2009, offset by the prior’s year impact of sign-on costs incurred in conjunction with the appointment of our President and Chief Executive Officer in 2009. Non-compensation expenses as a component of Operating Expenses were $89.1 million in 2010, an increase of $30.7 million, or 52% over non-compensation operating expenses of $58.4 million in 2009. Non-compensation operating expenses increased compared to 2009 primarily as a result of increased Professional Fees, Travel and Related Expenses, Depreciation and Amortization and Acquisition and Transition Costs, primarily driven by the addition of new businesses, including Atalanta Sosnoff, and higher deal-related activity levels.

Total Other Expenses of $23.0 million in 2010 related to compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $20.8 million and amortization of intangibles of $2.2 million. Total Other Expenses of $32.3 million in 2009 related to compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $9.4 million, special charges of $20.1 million in conjunction with the cancellation of employee share-based awards, the U.S. Private Equity restructuring and other ongoing strategic cost management initiatives, acquisition and transition costs of $0.7 million incurred in connection with the consummation of our acquisition of SFS and the formation of ETC and amortization of intangibles of $2.1 million.

Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense as a percentage of Net Revenues was 66% for the year ended December 31, 2010, compared to 66% for the year ended December 31, 2009.

The provision for income taxes in 2010 was $16.2 million, which reflected an effective tax rate of 45%. The 2010 provision was impacted by the non-deductible compensation expense associated with the vesting of LP Units and certain other awards, as well as losses in certain foreign jurisdictions for which no foreign income tax benefits are anticipated. The provision for income taxes in 2009 was $19.7 million, which reflected an effective tax rate of 89%. The 2009 provision was impacted by non-deductible charges for the cancellation of certain equity awards for employees who continue to be employed by us, the modification of LP Units and certain other awards, as well as a valuation allowance on our deferred tax assets associated with our foreign subsidiaries and certain discrete adjustments and non-deductible equity-based share grants resulting from a decline in our share price from the date of grant to the date of vesting, which were permanent in nature.

Income (loss) from equity method investments was ($0.6) million for 2010, as compared to ($1.4) million for 2009.

Noncontrolling interest was $10.7 million in 2010 compared to $3.5 million for 2009. We had net income attributable to Evercore Partners Inc. and the allocation to non-controlling interests was an allocation of net income.

Impairment of Assets

In October 2011, EAM announced its plan to wind down its business. As a result, we recorded a charge of $1.0 million in the third quarter of 2011 relating to the write-off of intangible assets associated with EAM. In addition, we recorded a charge of $0.8 million in the fourth quarter of 2011, primarily representing payments for severance and related expenses and facilities and contract termination costs. These charges were included in Discontinued Operations.

As a result of the above, during October 2011 we performed a Step 1 impairment test for the Goodwill in our Institutional Asset Management reporting unit, which included EAM. The amount of Goodwill allocated to this reporting unit was $94.7 million as of September 30, 2011. In this process, we made estimates and assumptions to determine the fair value of this reporting unit and to project future earnings using valuation techniques. We used our best judgment and the information available to us at the time to perform this review. Because assumptions and estimates are used in projecting future earnings as part of the valuation, actual results could differ. Certain circumstances such as continued decreases in AUM resulting from either net outflows or market declines may have a negative impact on the future earnings of this reporting unit and could have a negative effect on its fair value.

 

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In determining the fair value of this reporting unit, we utilized both a market multiple approach and a discounted cash flow methodology based on the adjusted cash flows from operations. The market multiple approach included applying the average earnings multiples of comparable public companies, multiplied by the forecasted earnings of the reporting unit, to yield an estimate of fair value. The discounted cash flow methodology began with the adjusted cash flows from the reporting unit and used a discount rate that reflected the weighted average cost of capital adjusted for the risks inherent in the future cash flows. As of September 30, 2011, we concluded that the fair value of our Institutional Asset Management reporting unit exceeded its carrying value by approximately 15%.

Business Segments

The following data presents revenue, expenses and contributions by business segment.

Investment Banking

The following table summarizes the operating results of the Investment Banking segment.

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,     Change  
     2011     2010     2009     2011 v. 2010     2010 v. 2009  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Revenues

          

Investment Banking Revenue(1)

   $ 430,597      $ 301,931      $ 293,311        43     3

Other Revenue, net(2)

     (2,473     (84     (677     NM        88
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Net Revenues

     428,124        301,847        292,634        42     3
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Expenses

          

Operating Expenses

     337,886        240,312        204,399        41     18

Other Expenses

     55,591        19,408        17,728        186     9
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Total Expenses

     393,477        259,720        222,127        52     17
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Operating Income(3)

     34,647        42,127        70,507        (18 %)      (40 %) 

Income from Equity Method Investments

     1,101        16        —          NM        NM   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Pre-Tax Income

   $ 35,748      $ 42,143      $ 70,507        (15 %)      (40 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

(1) Includes transaction-related client reimbursements of $12.0 million, $9.9 million and $6.0 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 

(2) Includes interest expense on the Senior Notes of $4.2 million, $4.2 million and $2.7 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 

(3) Includes Noncontrolling interest of ($5.6) million and ($4.7) million for the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively.

For 2011, the level of announced and completed M&A activity increased versus 2010, as evidenced by the following industry statistics regarding the volume of transactions:

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,  
           2011                  2010                  2009        

Industry Statistics ($ in billions)*

        

Value of North American M&A Deals Announced

   $ 1,065       $ 874       $ 843   

Value of North American M&A Deals Completed

   $ 945       $ 774       $ 839   

Value of Global M&A Deals Announced

   $ 2,517       $ 2,341       $ 1,995   

Value of Global M&A Deals Completed

   $ 2,304       $ 1,908       $ 1,843   

Evercore Statistics**

        

Total Number of Fee Paying Clients

     245         183         162   

Investment Banking Clients With Fees of at Least $1 million

     94         62         42   

 

* Source: Thomson Financial January 16, 2012
** Includes revenue generating clients only

 

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Investment Banking Results of Operations

2011 versus 2010

Net Investment Banking Revenues were $428.1 million in 2011 compared to $301.8 million in 2010, which represented an increase of 42%. Investment Banking Revenues for 2011 included $14.9 million and $8.8 million of commissions and underwriting revenues, respectively. We earned revenue from 245 advisory clients in 2011, 94 of which exceeded $1.0 million in revenue, compared to 183 clients in 2010, 62 of which exceeded $1.0 million in revenue. The increase in revenues from 2010 reflects our acquisition of Lexicon in August 2011. Also contributing to the increase in revenues for 2011 was the expansion of our existing businesses and our new businesses and increased deal activity.

Operating Expenses were $337.9 million in 2011, as compared to $240.3 million in 2010, an increase of $97.6 million, or 41%. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $249.7 million in 2011, as compared to $178.4 million in 2010, an increase of $71.4 million, or 40%. The increase was due to compensation costs resulting primarily from our new businesses, as well as increased headcount in our advisory business and the inclusion of Lexicon professionals. Non-compensation expenses, as a component of Operating Expenses, were $88.2 million in 2011, as compared to $61.9 million in 2010, an increase of $26.2 million, or 42%. Non-compensation operating expenses increased from the prior year primarily driven by growth in the business and higher deal-related activity levels, as well as acquisition costs associated with Lexicon. The increase in Investment Banking headcount has led directly and indirectly to cost increases relating to occupancy, travel, and professional and regulatory fees.

Other Expenses of $55.6 million in 2011 included compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $21.3 million, vesting of event-based awards of $8.9 million, acquisition related compensation charges of $14.6 million, special charges of $3.9 million and intangible asset amortization of $6.8 million. Other Expenses of $19.4 million in 2010 included compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $17.5 million and intangible asset amortization of $1.9 million.

2010 versus 2009

Net Investment Banking Revenues were $301.8 million in 2010 compared to $292.6 million in 2009, which represented an increase of 3%. We earned revenue from 183 advisory clients in 2010, 62 of which exceeded $1.0 million in revenue, compared to 162 clients in 2009, 42 of which exceeded $1.0 million in revenue. The increase in revenues from 2009 primarily reflected the increase in revenue from new initiatives.

Operating Expenses were $240.3 million in 2010, as compared to $204.4 million in 2009, an increase of $35.9 million, or 18%. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $178.4 million in 2010, as compared to $163.3 million in 2009, an increase of $15.1 million, or 9%. The increase was due to compensation costs resulting primarily from our new businesses, as well as increased headcount in our advisory business, offset by the prior’s year impact of sign-on costs incurred in conjunction with the appointment of our President and Chief Executive Officer. Non-compensation expenses, as a component of Operating Expenses, were $61.9 million in 2010, as compared to $41.1 million in 2009, an increase of $20.8 million, or 51%. Non-compensation operating expenses increased from the prior year primarily driven by growth in the business and higher deal-related activity levels.

Other Expenses of $19.4 million in 2010 included compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $17.5 million and intangible asset amortization of $1.9 million. Other Expenses of $17.7 million in 2009 included compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $7.9 million, special charges of $7.9 million and intangible asset amortization of $1.9 million.

 

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Investment Management

The following table summarizes the operating results of the Investment Management segment.

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,     Change  
     2011     2010     2009     2011 v. 2010     2010 v. 2009  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Revenues

          

Management Fees:

          

Wealth Management

   $ 15,296      $ 9,826      $ 3,903        56     152

Institutional Asset Management

     65,810        48,694        12,771        35     281

Private Equity

     7,558        8,396        10,210        (10 %)      (18 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Total Management Fees

     88,664        66,916        26,884        33     149
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Realized and Unrealized Gains (Losses):

          

Institutional Asset Management

     4,297        5,546        713        (23 %)      678

Private Equity

     6,200        2,148        (5,179     189     NM   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Total Realized and Unrealized Gains (Losses)

     10,497        7,694        (4,466     36     NM   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Other Investments(1)

     —          —          (1,254     NM        NM   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Investment Management Revenue(2)

     99,161        74,610        21,164        33     253

Other Revenue, net(3)

     (3,021     (552     (1,381     (447 %)      60
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Net Investment Management Revenues

     96,140        74,058        19,783        30     274
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Expenses

          

Operating Expenses

     89,269        75,704        52,233        18     45

Other Expenses

     5,706        3,621        14,609        58     (75 %) 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Total Expenses

     94,975        79,325        66,842        20     19
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Operating Income (Loss)(4)

     1,165        (5,267     (47,059     NM        89

Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments(5)

     (182     (573     (1,406     68     59
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

Pre-Tax Income (Loss)(6)

   $ 983      $ (5,840   $ (48,465     NM        88
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

     

 

(1) Includes EAM, which was consolidated April 1, 2009.

 

(2) Includes transaction-related client reimbursements of $0.6 million, $0.2 million and $0.2 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 

(3) Includes interest expense on the Senior Notes of $3.6 million, $3.5 million and $4.9 million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 

(4) Includes Noncontrolling interest of $2.6 million, $1.0 million and ($2.2) million for the years ended December 31, 2011, 2010 and 2009, respectively.

 

(5) Equity in Pan, G5 and ABS are classified as Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments.

 

(6) Amounts above exclude the results of EAM after its consolidation. The results were reclassified to Discontinued Operations during the fourth quarter of 2011.

Investment Management Results of Operations

Our Wealth Management business includes the results of EWM and Morse, Williams and Company, Inc., which was acquired during the second quarter of 2010. Our Institutional Asset Management business includes the results of ETC, which was consolidated in the second quarter of 2009, and Atalanta Sosnoff, which was consolidated during the second quarter of 2010. Our results for 2010 include seven months of Atalanta Sosnoff’s results, while our results for 2009 include eight months of ETC’s results. Fee-based revenues from EWM and Atalanta Sosnoff are primarily earned as a percentage of AUM, while ETC primarily earns fees from negotiated trust services and fiduciary consulting arrangements.

Our U.S. private equity funds, with the exception of Evercore Capital Partners L.P. and its affiliated entities (“ECP I”), earn management fees of 1% of invested capital. Starting January 1, 2010, pursuant to an amendment

 

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to the ECP I Partnership Agreement, no management fees were earned. Our Mexican private equity fund, EMCP II, earns management fees of 2.25% on committed capital during its investment period and 2.25% on net funded committed capital thereafter.

In addition, the general partner of the private equity funds earns carried interest of 20% based on the fund’s performance, provided it exceeds preferred return hurdles to its limited partners. We own 8%-9% of the carried interest earned by the general partner of ECP II and 100% of Carried Interest in EMCP II. A significant portion of any gains recognized related to ECP II are distributed to certain of our U.S. private equity professionals.

In the event the fund performs below certain thresholds we may be obligated to repay certain carried interest previously distributed. As of December 31, 2011, we had $2.7 million of previously received carried interest that may be subject to repayment.

Assets Under Management

AUM for our Investment Management business of $13.0 billion at December 31, 2011, decreased from $16.9 billion at December 31, 2010. The amounts of AUM presented in the table below reflect the assets for which we charge a management fee. These assets reflect the fair value of assets managed on behalf of Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management clients, and the amount of either invested or committed capital to the Private Equity funds. As defined in ASC 820, “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures” (“ASC 820”), valuations performed for Level I investments are based on quoted prices obtained from active markets generated by third parties and Level II investments are valued through the use of models based on either direct or indirect observable inputs in the use of models or other valuation methodologies performed by third parties to determine fair value. For both the Level I and Level II investments, we obtain both active quotes from nationally recognized exchanges and third-party pricing services to determine market or fair value quotes, respectively. Wealth Management maintained 49% and 48% of Level I investments and 51% and 52% of Level II investments as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, and Institutional Asset Management maintained 92% and 95% of Level I investments and 8% and 5% of Level II investments as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively. As noted above, Private Equity AUM is not presented at fair market value, but reported at either invested or committed capital in line with fee arrangements; notwithstanding, these assets represent primarily Level III investments. The following table summarizes AUM activity for the year ended December 31, 2011:

 

     Wealth
Management
    Institutional
Asset
Management
    Private
Equity
    Total  
     (dollars in millions)  

Balance at December 31, 2010

   $ 2,506      $ 13,770      $ 629      $ 16,905   

Inflows

     323        953        —          1,276   

Outflows

     (15     (1,308     (24     (1,347

Market Appreciation

     23        461        —          484   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at March 31, 2011

     2,837        13,876        605        17,318   

Inflows

     106        890        —          996   

Outflows

     (57     (1,827     —          (1,884

Market Appreciation (Depreciation)

     6        (213     —          (207
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at June 30, 2011

     2,892        12,726        605        16,223   

Inflows

     111        594        —          705   

Outflows

     (46     (1,843     —          (1,889

Market Appreciation (Depreciation)

     (76     (1,771     —          (1,847
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at September 30, 2011

     2,881        9,706        605        13,192   

Inflows

     359        201        —          560   

Outflows

     (82     (1,279     —          (1,361

Market Appreciation

     82        545        —          627   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

   $ 3,240      $ 9,173      $ 605      $ 13,018   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Note: Amounts above exclude AUM associated with EAM, whose results were reclassified to Discontinued Operations during the fourth quarter of 2011.

 

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AUM decreased from December 31, 2010 primarily due to net outflows and market depreciation in Institutional Asset Management.

2011 versus 2010

Net Investment Management Revenues were $96.1 million in 2011, compared to $74.1 million in 2010. Fee-based revenues earned from the management of client portfolios and other investment advisory services increased 33% from 2010 primarily as a result of the full period’s impact of the acquisition of new businesses in 2010 within Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management. Fee-based revenues included $0.2 million of revenues from performance fees during 2011 compared to $0.3 million in 2010. Realized and Unrealized Gains (Losses) increased from the prior year primarily resulting from gains on the seed capital managed by EWM and G5 and in our private equity funds, which were principally driven by carried interest from Trilantic.

Operating Expenses were $89.3 million in 2011, as compared to $75.7 million in 2010, an increase of $13.6 million, or 18%. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $58.2 million in 2011, as compared to $48.5 million in 2010, an increase of $9.7 million, or 20%. Non-compensation expenses, as a component of Operating Expenses, were $31.0 million in 2011, as compared to $27.2 million in 2010, an increase of $3.8 million, or 14%. The increase in Operating Expenses was primarily a result of the acquisition and expansion of new businesses added during 2010 and 2011.

Other Expenses of $5.7 million in 2011 included compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $2.9 million, vesting of event-based awards of $2.5 million and amortization of intangibles of $0.3 million. Other Expenses of $3.6 million in 2010 included compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $3.3 million and amortization of intangibles of $0.3 million.

2010 versus 2009

Net Investment Management Revenues were $74.1 million in 2010, compared to $19.8 million in 2009. Fee-based revenues earned from the management of client portfolios and other investment advisory services increased 149% from 2009 primarily as a result of the acquisition of new businesses within Institutional Asset Management and Wealth Management, as well as continued growth in AUM. Fee-based revenues included $0.3 million of revenues from performance fees during 2010 compared to $0.1 million in 2009. Realized and Unrealized Gains (Losses) increased from the prior year primarily resulting from gains on the seed capital managed by EWM and G5 and realized gains in PCB and in our private equity funds.

Operating Expenses were $75.7 million in 2010, as compared to $52.2 million in 2009, an increase of $23.5 million, or 45%. Employee Compensation and Benefits Expense, as a component of Operating Expenses, was $48.5 million in 2010, as compared to $34.9 million in 2009, an increase of $13.6 million, or 39%. Non-compensation expenses, as a component of Operating Expenses, were $27.2 million in 2010, as compared to $17.3 million in 2009, an increase of $9.9 million, or 57%. The increase in Operating Expenses was primarily a result of the acquisition of new businesses added during 2009 and 2010.

Other Expenses of $3.6 million in 2010 included compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $3.3 million and amortization of intangibles of $0.3 million. Other Expenses of $14.6 million in 2009 included compensation costs associated with unvested LP Units and certain other awards of $1.5 million, special charges of $12.2 million, acquisition and transition costs of $0.7 million and amortization of intangibles of $0.2 million.

Follow-On Offerings of Class A Common Stock

During 2011 and 2010, we completed offerings of 5,364,991 and 2,954,437 shares of Class A common stock, respectively. Net proceeds in conjunction with these issuances were $168.1 million and $77.2 million, respectively. A portion of the proceeds from the 2011 offering was used to purchase from certain holders, including members of the Company’s senior management, a number of outstanding LP Units. The Company used

 

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a portion of the remaining proceeds to fund the initial cash payments associated with the acquisition of Lexicon. We used all of the proceeds from the 2010 offering to purchase from certain holders, including members of our senior management, a number of outstanding LP Units that was equal to the number of newly-issued shares of Class A common stock sold by us in the offering.

In addition, LP Units held by members of Evercore LP (“Members”) may be exchanged in the future for shares of our Class A common stock on a one-for-one basis, subject to customary conversion rate adjustments for stock splits, stock dividends and reclassifications. The above exchanges and any such future exchanges are expected to result in an increase in the tax basis of the tangible and intangible assets of Evercore LP. These increases in tax basis increase (for tax purposes) amortization and, therefore, reduce the amount of tax that we would otherwise be required to pay.

We have entered into a tax receivable agreement with Members that provides for the payment by us to an exchanging Member of 85% of the amount of cash savings, if any, in U.S. federal, state and local income tax that we actually realize as a result of these increases in tax basis. We expect to benefit from the remaining 15% of cash savings, if any, in income tax that we realize. While the actual amount and timing of any payments under this agreement will vary depending upon a number of factors, including the timing of exchanges, the extent to which such exchanges are taxable and the amount and timing of our income, we expect that, as a result of the size of the increases of the tangible and intangible assets of Evercore LP attributable to our interest in Evercore LP, during the expected term of the tax receivable agreement, the payments that we may make to our Members are expected to be substantial.

The effects of the tax receivable agreement on our Consolidated Statement of Financial Condition as a result of the above exchanges were increases of $47.5 million and $37.0 million related to the 2011 and 2010 offerings, respectively, in deferred tax assets for the estimated income tax effects of the increase in the tax basis of the assets owned by Evercore LP, based on enacted federal and state tax rates at the dates of the transactions. To the extent we estimate that we will not realize the full benefit represented by the deferred tax asset, based on an analysis of expected future earnings, we will reduce the deferred tax asset with a valuation allowance.

We also recorded 85% of the estimated realizable tax benefit (which is the recorded deferred tax asset less any recorded valuation allowance) as increases of $40.4 million and $31.4 million related to the 2011 and 2010 offerings, respectively, between Amounts Due Pursuant to Tax Receivable Agreements and Payable to Employees and Related Parties. We recorded the remaining 15% of the estimated realizable tax benefit, or $7.1 million and $5.5 million related to the 2011 and 2010 offerings, respectively, as increases to Additional Paid-In-Capital.

The amounts that were recorded for both the deferred tax asset and the liability for our obligations under the tax receivable agreement have been estimated. Any additional payments under the tax receivable agreement that will further increase the tax benefits and the estimated payments under the tax receivable agreement have not been included in the estimates. All of the effects of changes in any of our estimates after the dates of the exchanges will be included in net income. Similarly, the effect of subsequent changes in the enacted tax rates will be included in net income. Future exchanges of LP Units for our shares of Class A common stock will be accounted for in a similar manner.

Cash Flows

Our operating cash flows are primarily influenced by the timing and receipt of investment banking and investment management fees, and the payment of operating expenses, including bonuses to our employees and interest expense on our Senior Notes. Investment Banking advisory fees are generally collected within 90 days of billing. However, placement fees may be collected within 180 days of billing. Management fees from our private equity investment management activities are generally billed in advance but collected at the end of a half year period from billing. Fees from our Wealth Management and Institutional Asset Management businesses are

 

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generally billed and collected within 90 days. We traditionally pay a substantial portion of incentive compensation to personnel in the Investment Banking business and to executive officers during the first three months of each calendar year with respect to the prior year’s results. Our investing and financing cash flows are primarily influenced by activities to deploy capital to fund investments and acquisitions, raise capital through the issuance of stock or debt, repurchase of outstanding Class A shares, payment of dividends and other periodic distributions to our stakeholders. We generally make dividend payments and other distributions on a quarterly basis. A summary of our operating, investing and financing cash flows is as follows:

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,  
     2011     2010     2009  
     (dollars in thousands)  

Cash Provided By (Used In)

      

Operating activities:

      

Net income

   $ 10,531      $ 17,805      $ 246   

Non-cash charges

     122,250        66,464        78,796   

Other operating activities

     15,055        (39,274     9,059   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Operating activities

     147,836        44,995        88,101   

Investing activities

     (77,344     (43,866     (42,680

Financing activities

     (25,081     (66,823     (14,880

Effect of exchange rate changes

     (3,843     349        239   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents

     41,568        (65,345     30,780   

Cash and Cash Equivalents

      

Beginning of Period

     141,337        206,682        175,902   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

End of Period

   $ 182,905      $ 141,337      $ 206,682   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

2011. Cash and Cash Equivalents were $182.9 million at December 31, 2011, an increase of $41.6 million versus Cash and Cash Equivalents of $141.3 million at December 31, 2010. Operating activities resulted in a net inflow of $147.8 million, primarily related to earnings excluding non-cash charges, which reflect share-based compensation and other deferred compensation. Cash of $77.3 million was used in investing activities primarily due to cash paid for acquisitions and the Company’s investment in ABS, made during the fourth quarter of 2011, offset by net proceeds from sales and maturities of Marketable Securities. Financing activities during the period used cash of $25.1 million, primarily for the purchase of LP Units, payment of dividends, distributions to Members and treasury stock purchases offset by the issuance and sale of Class A Shares.

2010. Cash and Cash Equivalents were $141.3 million at December 31, 2010, a decrease of $65.3 million versus Cash and Cash Equivalents of $206.7 million at December 31, 2009. Operating activities resulted in a net inflow of $45.0 million, primarily related to earnings excluding non-cash charges, which reflect share-based compensation and other deferred compensation, offset by the payment of 2009 bonus awards. Cash of $43.9 million was used in investing activities primarily due to cash paid for acquisitions, offset by net proceeds from sales and maturities of Marketable Securities. Financing activities during the period used cash of $66.8 million, primarily for the purchase of LP Units, payment of dividends, distributions to Members and treasury stock purchases offset by the issuance and sale of Class A Shares.

2009. Cash and Cash Equivalents were $206.7 million at December 31, 2009, an increase of $30.8 million versus Cash and Cash Equivalents of $175.9 million at December 31, 2008. Operating activities during 2009 resulted in a net inflow of $88.1 million, primarily related to higher earnings, excluding non-cash charges which reflect an increase in share-based compensation resulting from the cancellation of certain equity awards, and an increase in accrued compensation and benefits, offset by an increase in assets segregated for bank regulators. Cash of $42.7 million was used in investing activities primarily for purchases of marketable securities and the acquisitions of SFS and EAM. Financing activities during the period used cash of $14.9 million, primarily for Member distributions, the purchase of LP Units, payment of dividends and treasury stock purchases offset by the issuance and sale of Class A Shares, LP Units and for cash received from the noncontrolling interest of ETC.

 

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

General

Our current assets include Cash and Cash Equivalents, Marketable Securities and Accounts Receivable in relation to Investment Banking and Investment Management revenues. Our current liabilities include accrued expenses and accrued employee compensation. We traditionally have made payments for employee bonuses and year-end distributions to partners in the first quarter of the year with respect to the prior year’s results. Cash distributions related to partnership tax allocations are made to the partners of Evercore LP in accordance with our corporate estimated payment calendar; these payments are made prior to the end of each calendar quarter. In addition, dividends on Class A Shares are paid when and if declared by the Board of Directors, which is generally quarterly.

We regularly monitor our liquidity position, including cash, other significant working capital, current assets and liabilities, long-term liabilities, lease commitments, principal investment commitments related to our Investment Management business, dividends on Class A Shares, partnership distributions and other matters relating to liquidity and compliance with regulatory requirements. Our liquidity is highly dependent on our revenue stream from our operations, principally from our Investment Banking business, which is a function of closing transactions and earning success fees, the timing and realization of which is irregular and dependent upon factors that are not subject to our control. Our revenue stream funds the payment of our expenses, including annual bonus payments, a portion of which are guaranteed, interest expense on our Senior Notes and income taxes. Payments made for income taxes may be reduced by deductions taken for the increase in tax basis of our investment in Evercore LP. These tax deductions, when realized, require payment under our long-term liability, Amounts Due Pursuant to Tax Receivable Agreements. We intend to fund these payments from cash and cash equivalents on hand, principally derived from cash flows from operations. These tax deductions, when realized, will result in cash otherwise required to satisfy tax obligations becoming available for other purposes. Our Management Committee meets regularly to monitor our liquidity and cash positions against our short and long-term obligations, as well as our capital requirements and commitments. The result of this review contributes to management’s recommendation to the Board of Directors as to the level of quarterly dividend payments, if any.

As a financial services firm, our businesses are materially affected by conditions in the global financial markets and economic conditions throughout the world. Revenue generated by our advisory activities is directly related to the number and value of the transactions in which we are involved. During periods of unfavorable market or economic conditions, the number and value of M&A transactions generally decrease, and they increase during periods of favorable market or economic conditions. Restructuring activity generally is counter-cyclical to M&A activity. In addition, during periods of unfavorable market conditions our Investment Management business may be impacted by reduced equity valuations and generate relatively lower revenue because fees we receive typically are in part based on the market value of underlying publicly-traded securities. Our profitability may also be adversely affected by our fixed costs and the possibility that we would be unable to scale back other costs within a time frame sufficient to match any decreases in revenue relating to changes in market and economic conditions. Reduced equity valuations resulting from future adverse economic events and/or market conditions may impact our performance, which could result in future impairment charges related to our goodwill and/or intangibles assets. The global financial markets have experienced significant disruption and volatility beginning in the third quarter of 2011 and it is possible that difficult market conditions may persist throughout 2012. These economic and market conditions have negatively affected our financial performance in our Investment Management businesses, resulting in significant decreases in AUM, which may continue to adversely affect our financial performance in 2012. Furthermore, if these adverse economic and market conditions persist, they may also have a negative impact on our Investment Banking business. For a further discussion of risks related to our business, refer to “Risk Factors” elsewhere in this Form 10-K.

In October 2010, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to 2 million Class A Shares and/or LP Units for up to $85.0 million. Under this share repurchase program, shares may be repurchased from time to time in open market transactions, in privately-negotiated transactions or otherwise. The timing and the actual amount of shares repurchased will depend on a variety of factors, including legal requirements, price and economic and market conditions. This program may be suspended or discontinued at any time and does not have a specified expiration date.

 

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In addition, periodically, we purchase LP Units in conjunction with follow-on offerings and we buy shares into treasury from our employees in order to allow them to satisfy their minimum tax requirements for share deliveries under our share equity plan. See “Follow-On Offerings of Class A Common Stock” above. During 2011, we repurchased 1,586,780 shares for $45.1 million primarily related to minimum tax withholding requirements of share deliveries.

On August 21, 2008, we entered into a Purchase Agreement with Mizuho pursuant to which Mizuho purchased from us $120.0 million principal amount of Senior Notes and the Warrants to purchase 5,454,545 Class A Shares at $22.00 per share expiring in 2020. The holder of the Senior Notes may require us to purchase, for cash, all or any portion of the holder’s Senior Notes upon a change of control of the Company for a price equal to the Accreted Amount, plus accrued and unpaid interest. Senior Notes held by Mizuho will be redeemable at the Accreted Amount at our option at any time within 90 days following the date on which Mizuho notifies us that it is terminating their Strategic Alliance Agreement. Senior Notes held by any holder other than Mizuho will be redeemable at the Accreted Amount (plus accrued and unpaid interest) at our option at any time. In the event of a default under the indenture, the trustee or holders of 33 1/3% of the Senior Notes may declare that the Accreted Amount is immediately due and payable.

Pursuant to the agreement, Mizuho may not transfer the Senior Notes or Warrants until either (a) after August 16, 2012 or (b) if the Strategic Alliance Agreement is terminated one year following such termination. We have a right of first offer on any proposed transfer by Mizuho of the Warrants, Common Stock purchased by Mizuho in the open market or acquired by Mizuho upon exercise of the Warrants and associated Common Stock issued as dividends.

The exercise price for the Warrants is payable, at the option of the holder of the Warrants, either in cash or by tender of Senior Notes at the Accreted Amount, at any point in time.

Pursuant to the agreement with Mizuho, Evercore is subject to certain nonfinancial covenants. As of December 31, 2011, we were in compliance with all of these covenants.

We have made certain capital commitments, with respect to our investment activities, as well as commitments related to redeemable noncontrolling interest and contingent consideration from our acquisitions, which are included in the Contractual Obligations section below.

PCB maintains a line of credit with BBVA Bancomer to fund its trading activities on an intra-day and overnight basis. The intra-day facility is approximately $7.2 million and is secured with trading securities when used on an overnight basis. No interest is charged on the intra-day facility. The overnight facility is charged the Inter-Bank Balance Interest Rate plus 10 basis points and is secured with trading securities. There have been no significant draw downs on PCB’s line of credit since August 10, 2006. The line of credit is renewable annually.

Pursuant to deferred compensation and deferred consideration arrangements, we are obligated to make cash payments in future periods. For further information see Notes 4 and 17 to our consolidated financial statements.

Certain of our subsidiaries are regulated entities and are subject to capital requirements. For further information see Note 19 to our consolidated financial statements.

Collateralized Financing Activity at PCB

PCB enters into repurchase agreements with clients seeking overnight money market returns whereby PCB transfers to the clients Mexican government securities in exchange for cash and concurrently agrees to repurchase the securities at a future date for an amount equal to the cash exchanged plus a stipulated premium or interest factor. PCB deploys the cash received from, and acquires the securities deliverable to, clients under these repurchase arrangements by purchasing securities in the open market or by entering into reverse repurchase agreements with unrelated third parties. We account for these repurchase and reverse repurchase agreements as

 

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collateralized financing transactions. We record a liability on our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition in relation to repurchase transactions executed with clients as Securities Sold Under Agreements to Repurchase. We record as assets on our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value (where we have acquired the securities deliverable to clients under these repurchase arrangements by purchasing securities in the open market) and Securities Purchased Under Agreements to Resell (where we have acquired the securities deliverable to clients under these repurchase agreements by entering into reverse repurchase agreements with unrelated third parties). These Mexican government securities included in Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition have an estimated average time to maturity of approximately 3.0 years, as of December 31, 2011, and are pledged as collateral against repurchase agreements, which are collateralized financing agreements. Generally, collateral is posted equal to the contract value at inception and is subject to market changes. These repurchase agreements are primarily with institutional customer accounts managed by PCB, generally mature within one business day and permit the counterparty to pledge the securities. Increases and decreases in asset and liability levels related to these transactions are a function of growth in PCB’s AUM, as well as clients’ investment allocations requiring positioning in repurchase transactions.

PCB has procedures in place to monitor the daily risk limits for positions taken, as well as the credit risk based on the collateral pledged under these agreements against their contract value from inception to maturity date. The daily risk measure is Value at Risk, which is a statistical measure, at a 98% confidence level, of the potential losses from adverse market movements in an ordinary market environment based on a historical simulation using the prior year’s historical data. PCB’s Risk Management Committee meets monthly to analyze the overall market risk exposure based on positions taken, as well as the credit risk, based on the collateral pledged under these agreements against the contract value from inception to maturity date.

We periodically assess the collectability or credit quality related to securities purchased under agreements to resell; as of December 31, 2011, the Company believes it maintains a sufficient level of cash or collateral.

As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, a summary of PCB’s assets, liabilities and risk measures related to its collateralized financing activities is as follows:

 

     December 31, 2011     December 31, 2010  
     Amount     Market Value of
Collateral Received or
(Pledged)
    Amount     Market Value of
Collateral Received or
(Pledged)
 
     (dollars in thousands)  

Assets

        

Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value

   $ 127,178        $ 52,217     

Securities Purchased Under Agreements to Resell

     2,146      $ 2,143        126,401      $ 126,386   
  

 

 

     

 

 

   

Total Assets

     129,324          178,618     

Liabilities

        

Securities Sold Under Agreements to Repurchase

     (129,577   $ (129,809     (178,683   $ (178,603
  

 

 

     

 

 

   

Net Liabilities

   $ (253     $ (65  
  

 

 

     

 

 

   

Risk Measures

        

Value at Risk

   $ 65        $ 27     
  

 

 

     

 

 

   

Sensitivity to a 100 basis point increase in the interest rate

   $ (366     $ (54  
  

 

 

     

 

 

   

Sensitivity to a 100 basis point decrease in the interest rate

   $ 366        $ 54     
  

 

 

     

 

 

   

 

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Contractual Obligations

The following table sets forth information relating to our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2011:

 

     Payment Due by Period  
     Total      Less than 1 year      1-3 years      3-5 years      More than
5 years
 
     (dollars in thousands)  

Operating Lease Obligations

   $ 202,014       $ 21,158       $ 38,404       $ 36,933       $ 105,519   

Tax Receivable Agreements

     143,660         6,217         21,650         24,078         91,715   

Notes Payable, Including Interest

     176,160         6,240         12,480         12,480         144,960   

Investment Banking Commitments

     16,990         15,836         1,154         —           —     

Investment Management Commitments

     13,291         2,050         5,885         467         4,889   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 552,115       $ 51,501       $ 79,573       $ 73,958       $ 347,083   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

As of December 31, 2011, we were unable to make reasonably reliable estimates of the period of cash settlement with the respective taxing authority, hence, per ASC 740, unrecognized tax benefits have been excluded from the above commitments and contractual obligations.

We had total commitments (not reflected on our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition) relating to future principal investments of $5.8 million and $8.1 million as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively. We expect to fund these commitments with cash flows from operations. We may be required to fund these commitments at any time through December 2017, depending on the timing and level of investments by our private equity funds.

On August 19, 2011, we consummated our acquisition of Lexicon. See Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements for information related to our commitment in this transaction.

We also have commitments related to our redeemable noncontrolling interests. See Note 15 for further information. See Note 4 for our commitments related to the contingent consideration for acquisitions.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

We do not invest in any off-balance sheet vehicles that provide liquidity, capital resources, market or credit risk support, or engage in any leasing activities that expose us to any liability that is not reflected in our consolidated financial statements.

Market Risk and Credit Risk

We, in general, are not a capital-intensive organization and as such, are not subject to significant market or credit risks. Nevertheless, we have established procedures to assess both the market and credit risk, as well as specific investment risk, exchange rate risk and credit risk related to receivables.

Market and Investment Risk

Institutional Asset Management

We invest in funds managed by EWM and G5. These funds principally hold readily-marketable investment securities. As of December 31, 2011, the fair value of our investments with these products, based on closing prices, was $11.7 million.

We estimate that a hypothetical 10% adverse change in the market value of the investments would have resulted in a decrease in pre-tax income of approximately $1.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.

See “-Liquidity and Capital Resources” above for a discussion of collateralized financing transactions at PCB.

 

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Private Equity Funds

Through our principal investments in our private equity funds and our ability to earn carried interest from these funds, we face exposure to changes in the estimated fair value of the companies in which these funds invest. Our professionals devote considerable time and resources to work closely with the portfolio company’s management to assist in designing a business strategy, allocating capital and other resources and evaluating expansion or acquisition opportunities. On a quarterly basis, we perform a comprehensive analysis and valuation of all of the portfolio companies. Our analysis includes reviewing the current market conditions and valuations of each portfolio company. Valuations and analysis regarding our investments in CSI Capital and Trilantic are performed by their respective professionals.

We estimate that a hypothetical 10% adverse change in the value of the private equity funds would have resulted in a decrease in pre-tax income of approximately $2.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2011.

Exchange Rate Risk

We have foreign operations, through our subsidiaries and affiliates, in Mexico, the United Kingdom, Brazil and Hong Kong which creates foreign exchange rate risk. Their respective functional currencies are the Mexican peso, British pound sterling, Brazilian real and Hong Kong dollar. We have not entered into any transactions to hedge our exposure to these foreign exchange fluctuations through the use of derivative instruments or otherwise. An appreciation or depreciation of any of these currencies relative to the U.S. dollar would result in an adverse or beneficial impact to our financial results. A significant portion of our Latin American revenues have been, and will continue to be, derived from contracts denominated in Mexican pesos and Evercore Europe’s revenue and expenses are denominated primarily in British pounds sterling and euro. Historically, the value of these foreign currencies has fluctuated relative to the U.S. dollar. For the year ended December 31, 2011, the net impact of the fluctuation of foreign currencies recorded in Other Comprehensive Income and Noncontrolling Interest within the Consolidated Statement of Equity was ($8.1) million. It is currently not our intention to hedge our foreign currency exposure, and we will reevaluate this policy from time to time.

Credit Risks

We maintain cash and cash equivalents with financial institutions with high credit ratings. At times, we may maintain deposits in federally insured financial institutions in excess of federally insured (“FDIC”) limits. However, we believe that we are not exposed to significant credit risk due to the financial position of the depository institution in which those deposits are held.

Accounts Receivable consists primarily of advisory fees and expense reimbursements billed to our clients. Receivables are reported net of any allowance for doubtful accounts. We maintain an allowance for bad debts to provide coverage for probable losses from our customer receivables and derive the estimate through specific identification for the allowance for doubtful accounts and an assessment of the client’s creditworthiness. As of December 31, 2011 and 2010, total receivables amounted to $52.1 million and $49.6 million, respectively, net of an allowance. The Investment Banking and Investment Management receivables collection periods generally are within 90 days of invoice, with the exception of placement fees, which are generally collected within 180 days of invoice. The collection period for restructuring transactions and private equity fee receivables may exceed 90 days. We recorded minimal bad debt expense for each of the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010.

With respect to our Marketable Securities portfolio, which is comprised primarily of highly rated corporate and municipal bonds, mutual funds and Seed Capital Investments, we manage our credit risk exposure by limiting concentration risk and maintaining investment grade credit quality. As of December 31, 2011, we had Marketable Securities of $81.3 million, of which 75% were corporate and municipal bonds and other debt securities primarily with S&P ratings ranging from AAA to BB+ and 25% were Seed Capital Investments and mutual funds.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The consolidated financial statements included in this report are prepared in conformity with U.S. GAAP, which requires management to make estimates and assumptions regarding future events that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and their notes, including reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenue and expenses, and related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We base these estimates on historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results could differ materially from those estimates. We believe that the following discussion addresses our most critical accounting policies, which are those that are most important to the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations and require management’s most difficult, subjective and complex judgments.

Revenue Recognition

Investment Banking Revenue

We earn investment banking fees from our clients for providing advisory services on mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, leveraged buyouts, restructurings and similar corporate finance matters. It is our accounting policy to recognize revenue when (i) there is persuasive evidence of an arrangement with a client, (ii) fees are fixed or determinable, (iii) the agreed-upon services have been completed and delivered to the client or the transaction or events contemplated in the engagement letter are determined to be substantially completed and (iv) collection is reasonably assured. We record Investment Banking Revenue on the Consolidated Statement of Operations for the following:

In general, advisory fees are paid at the time we sign an engagement letter, during the course of the engagement or when an engagement is completed. In some circumstances, and as a function of the terms of an engagement letter, we may receive retainer fees for financial advisory services concurrent with, or soon after, the execution of the engagement letter where the engagement letter will specify a future service period associated with that fee. In such circumstances, these retainer fees are initially recorded as deferred revenue, which is recorded within Other Current Liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, and subsequently recognized as revenue during the applicable time period within which the service is rendered. Revenues related to fairness or valuation opinions are recognized when the opinion has been rendered and delivered to the client and all other requirements for revenue recognition are satisfied. Success fees for advisory services, such as M&A advice, are recognized when the transaction(s) or event(s) are determined to be completed or substantially completed and all other requirements for revenue recognition are satisfied. In the event the Company were to receive an opinion or success fee in advance of the completion conditions noted above, such fee would initially be recorded as deferred revenue and subsequently recognized as advisory fee revenue when the conditions of completion have been satisfied.

Placement fee revenues are attributable to capital raising. We recognize placement advisory fees at the time of the client’s acceptance of capital or capital commitments in accordance with the terms of the engagement letter.

Underwriting revenues are attributable to public and private offerings of equity and debt securities and are recognized when the offering has been deemed to be completed by the lead manager of the underwriting group, pursuant to applicable SEC and FINRA rules. When the offering is completed, we recognize the applicable management fee, selling concession and underwriting fee, the latter net of estimated offering expenses.

Commissions received from customers on agency-based brokerage transactions in listed and over-the-counter equities are recorded on a trade-date basis or, in the case of payments under commission sharing arrangements, when earned.

Investment Management Revenue

Our Investment Management business generates revenues from the management of client assets and the private equity funds.

 

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Investment management fees generated for third-party clients are generally based on the value of the AUM and any performance fees that may be negotiated with the client. These fees are generally recognized over the period that the related services are provided, based upon the beginning, ending or average value of the assets for the relevant period. Fees paid in advance of services rendered are initially recorded as deferred revenue, which is recorded in Other Current Liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, and is recognized in Investment Management Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations ratably over the period in which the related service is rendered. Generally, to the extent performance fee arrangements have been negotiated, these fees are earned when the return on assets exceeds certain benchmark returns. Performance fees are accrued on a monthly basis and are not subject to adjustment once the measurement period ends (annually) and performance fees have been realized.

Management fees for private equity funds are contractual and are typically based on committed capital during the private equity funds’ investment period, and on invested capital thereafter. Management fees are recognized ratably over the period during which services are provided. We also record performance fee revenue from the private equity funds when the returns on the private equity funds’ investments exceed certain threshold minimums. These performance fees, or carried interest, are computed in accordance with the underlying private equity funds’ partnership agreements and are based on investment performance over the life of each investment partnership. Performance fees are recorded as revenue as earned pursuant to the client agreements.

Fees for serving as an independent fiduciary and/or trustee are either based on a flat fee or are based on the value of assets under administration. For ongoing engagements, fees are billed quarterly either in advance or in arrears. Fees paid in advance of services rendered are initially recorded as deferred revenue in Other Current Liabilities on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition, and are recognized in Investment Management Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations ratably over the period in which the related services are rendered.

Net Interest revenue is derived from investing customer funds in financing transactions. These transactions are primarily repurchases and resales of Mexican government securities. Revenue and expenses associated with these transactions are recognized over the term of the repurchase or resale transaction.

Valuation

The valuation of our investments in securities and of our financial investments in the funds we manage impacts both the carrying value of direct investments and the determination of management and performance fees, including carried interest. Effective January 1, 2008, we adopted ASC 820, which among other things requires enhanced disclosures about financial instruments carried at fair value. See Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements for further information. Level I investments include financial instruments owned and pledged as collateral and readily-marketable equity securities. Level II investments include our investments in corporate and municipal bonds and other debt securities. We did not have any Level III investments as of December 31, 2011.

We adopted ASC 825, “The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities”, which permits entities the option to measure most financial instruments and certain other items at fair value at specified election dates and to report related unrealized gains and losses in earnings. We have not elected to apply the fair value option to any specific financial assets or liabilities.

Marketable Securities

Investments in corporate and municipal bonds and other debt securities are accounted for as available-for-sale under ASC 320-10, “Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities”. These securities are carried at fair value on the Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. Unrealized gains and losses are reported as net increases or decreases to Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), net of tax, while realized gains and losses on these securities are determined using the specific identification method

 

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and are included in Other Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations. We invest in readily-marketable debt and equity securities which are managed by EWM and G5. These securities are valued using quoted market prices on applicable exchanges or markets. The realized and unrealized gains and losses on these securities are included in the Consolidated Statements of Operations in Investment Management Revenue. Marketable Securities also include investments in municipal bonds and mutual funds, which are carried at fair value, with changes in fair value recorded in Other Revenues on the Consolidated Statement of Operations.

Marketable Securities transactions are recorded as of the trade date.

Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value

Our Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value consist principally of foreign government obligations, which are recorded on a trade-date basis and are stated at quoted market values. Related gains and losses are reflected in Other Revenue on the Consolidated Statements of Operations. We pledge our Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value to collateralize certain financing arrangements which permits the counterparty to pledge the securities.

Equity Compensation

Share-Based Payments – We account for share-based payments in accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued ASC 718, “Share-Based Payment”. We grant employees event-based awards and performance-based awards that vest upon the occurrence of certain events or performance criteria being achieved. Compensation cost is accrued if it is probable that the event or performance condition will be achieved and is not accrued if it is not probable that the event or performance condition will be achieved. Significant judgment is required in determining the probability an event’s occurrence or that the performance criteria will be achieved. The fair value of awards that vest from one to five years are amortized over the vesting period or requisite substantive service period, as required by ASC 718. See Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements herein for further information.

Income Taxes

As part of the process of preparing our consolidated financial statements, we are required to estimate income taxes in each of the jurisdictions in which we operate. Significant management judgment is required in determining our provision for income taxes, our deferred tax assets and liabilities and any valuation allowance recorded against our net deferred tax assets. This process requires us to estimate our actual current tax liability and to assess temporary differences resulting from differing book versus tax treatment of items, such as deferred revenue, compensation and benefits expense, unrealized gains and losses on long-term investments and depreciation. These temporary differences result in deferred tax assets and liabilities, which are included within our Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition. We must then assess the likelihood that deferred tax assets will be recovered from future taxable income, and, to the extent we believe that recovery is not more-likely-than-not, we must establish a valuation allowance. The ultimate realization of the deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income during the periods in which temporary differences become deductible. Management considers the level of historical taxable income, scheduled reversals of deferred taxes, projected future taxable income and tax planning strategies that can be implemented by us in making this assessment. If actual results differ from these estimates or we adjust these estimates in future periods, we may need to adjust our valuation allowance, which could materially impact our consolidated financial condition and results of operations.

In addition, in order to determine the quarterly tax rate, we are required to estimate full year pre-tax income and the related annual income tax expense in each jurisdiction. Changes in the geographic mix or estimated level of annual pre-tax income can affect our overall effective tax rate. Furthermore, our interpretation of complex tax laws may impact our measurement of current and deferred income taxes.

 

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ASC 740 provides a benefit recognition model with a two-step approach consisting of “more-likely-than-not” recognition criteria, and a measurement attribute that measures the position as the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement. This standard also requires the recognition of liabilities created by differences between tax positions taken in a tax return and amounts recognized in the financial statements. See Note 20 to the consolidated financial statements herein in regard to the impact of the adoption of this standard on our consolidated financial statements.

The majority of the deferred tax assets relate to the U.S. operations of the Company. The realization of the deferred tax assets is primarily dependent on the amount of the Company’s historic and projected future taxable income for its U.S. and foreign operations. In 2011 and 2010, we performed an assessment of the ultimate realization of our deferred tax assets and determined that the Company should have sufficient future taxable income in the normal course of business to fully realize the portion of the deferred tax assets associated with its U.S. operations and management has concluded that it is more-likely-than-not the deferred tax assets will be realized. We also concluded that the net deferred tax assets of certain foreign subsidiaries required a full valuation allowance. We intend to maintain a valuation allowance until sufficient positive evidence exists to support its reversal. See Note 20 to the consolidated financial statements herein for further information.

The Company estimates that Evercore Partners Inc. must generate approximately $481.5 million of future taxable income to realize the U.S. deferred tax asset balance of approximately $195.3 million. The deferred tax balance is expected to reverse over a period ranging of 5 to 15 taxable years. The Company evaluated Evercore Partners Inc.’s historical U.S. taxable income, which has averaged approximately $22.8 million per year over the last two tax years, as well as the current anticipated profitability and taxable income in the future, which indicates sufficient taxable income to support the realization of these deferred tax assets. To the extent enough taxable income is not generated in the 15 year estimated reversal period, the Company will have an additional 20 years to utilize any net operating loss carry forwards created, as well as the relevant net operating loss carry back period in effect at the time of a taxable loss.

As part of the assessment of the ultimate realization of our deferred tax assets, we determined certain deferred tax assets of our foreign subsidiaries would require a valuation allowance. We concluded that the recoverability of these deferred tax assets was not more-likely-than-not to be recoverable as required by ASC 740. As a result of our assessment of the impacted foreign subsidiaries projected future taxable income relative to their cumulative net loss position, we concluded that, based on such negative evidence, a full valuation allowance was required. We intend to maintain a valuation allowance until sufficient positive evidence exists to support its reversal. The positive evidence that will be considered is sustained profitability resulting from significant growth going forward.

Impairment of Assets

In accordance with ASC 350, “Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets”, Goodwill is tested for impairment annually, or more frequently if circumstances indicate impairment may have occurred. In this process, we make estimates and assumptions in order to determine the fair value of our reporting units and to project future earnings using valuation techniques. We use our best judgment and information available to us at the time to perform this review. Because our assumptions and estimates are used in projecting future earnings as part of the valuation, actual results could differ. Intangible assets with finite lives are amortized over their estimated useful lives which are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount of such assets may not be recoverable as prescribed by ASC 360, “Accounting for the Impairment or Disposal of Long-Lived Assets”.

We test goodwill for impairment at the reporting unit level. In determining the fair value for each reporting unit, we utilize either a market multiple approach or a discounted cash flow methodology based on the adjusted cash flows from operations. The market multiple approach includes applying the average earnings multiples of comparable public companies for their respective reporting segment multiplied by the forecasted earnings of the respective reporting unit to yield an estimate of fair value. The discounted cash flow methodology begins with

 

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the adjusted cash flows from each of the reporting units and uses a discount rate that reflects the weighted average costs of capital adjusted for the risks inherent in the future cash flows. For the years ended December 31, 2011 and 2010, we have concluded the fair values substantially exceeded the carrying values for our reporting units.

In addition to Goodwill and Intangible Assets, we annually assess our Equity Method Investments for impairment per ASC 323-10-35 and ASC 325-20-35, respectively, “Subsequent Measurement”. At December 31, 2011, we concluded there was no impairment of Goodwill, Intangible Assets and Equity Method Investments. See Note 4 to our consolidated financial statements for further information.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

ASU 2011-03 – In April 2011, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) No. 2011-03, “Reconsideration of Effective Control for Repurchase Agreements” (“ASU 2011-03”). ASU 2011-03 provides amendments to Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) No. 860 “Transfers and Servicing”, which remove from the assessment of effective control (1) the criterion requiring the transferor to have the ability to repurchase or redeem the financial assets on substantially the agreed terms, even in the event of default by the transferee, and (2) the collateral maintenance implementation guidance related to that criterion. The amendments in this update are effective prospectively for transactions or modifications of existing transactions that occur on or after the beginning of the first interim or annual reporting period beginning on or after December 15, 2011, with early adoption not permitted. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this update on the Company’s consolidated financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

ASU 2011-04 – In May 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-04, “Amendments to Achieve Common Fair Value Measurement and Disclosure Requirements in U.S. GAAP and IFRS” (“ASU 2011-04”). ASU 2011-04 provides amendments to ASC No. 820 “Fair Value Measurement”, which results in a consistent definition of fair value and common requirements for measurement of and disclosure of fair value between U.S. GAAP and IFRS. Some of the amendments clarify the Board’s intent about the application of existing fair value measurement requirements, while others change a particular principle or requirement for measuring fair value or for disclosing information about fair value measurements. The amendments in this update are effective prospectively during interim and annual periods beginning after December 15, 2011, with early adoption not permitted. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this update on the Company’s consolidated financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

ASU 2011-05 – In June 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-05, “Presentation of Comprehensive Income” (“ASU 2011-05”). ASU 2011-05 provides amendments to ASC No. 220 “Comprehensive Income”, which require an entity to present the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the components of other comprehensive income either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. The amendments in this update are effective retrospectively for fiscal years and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011, with early adoption permitted. The FASB recently decided that the specific requirement to present items that are reclassified from other comprehensive income to net income alongside their respective components of net income and other comprehensive income will be deferred (See-“ASU 2011-12” below). The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this update on the Company’s consolidated financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

ASU 2011-08 – In September 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-08, “Testing Goodwill for Impairment” (“ASU 2011-08”). ASU 2011-08 provides amendments to ASC No. 350 “Intangibles – Goodwill and Other”, which are intended to reduce complexity and costs by allowing an entity the option to make a qualitative evaluation about the likelihood of goodwill impairment to determine whether it should calculate the fair value of a reporting unit. The amendments also improve previous guidance by expanding upon the examples of events and circumstances that an entity should consider between annual impairment tests in determining whether it is more-likely-than-not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. Also, the

 

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amendments improve the examples of events and circumstances that an entity having a reporting unit with a zero or negative carrying amount should consider in determining whether to measure an impairment loss, if any, under the second step of the goodwill impairment test. The amendments are effective for annual and interim goodwill impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2011, with early adoption permitted. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this update on the Company’s consolidated financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

ASU 2011-11 – In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-11, “Disclosures about Offsetting Assets and Liabilities” (“ASU 2011-11”). ASU 2011-11 provides amendments to ASC No. 210, “Balance Sheet”, which are intended to enhance disclosures required by U.S. GAAP by requiring improved information about financial instruments and derivative instruments that are either (1) offset in accordance with either Section 210-20-45 or Section 815-10-45 or (2) subject to an enforceable master netting arrangement or similar agreement, irrespective of whether they are offset in accordance with either Section 210-20-45 or Section 815-10-45. This information will enable users of an entity’s financial statements to evaluate the effect or potential effect of netting arrangements on an entity’s financial position, including the effect or potential effect of rights of setoff associated with certain financial instruments and derivative instruments in the scope of this update. The amendments in this update are effective retrospectively for interim and annual periods beginning after January 1, 2013. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this update on the Company’s consolidated financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

ASU 2011-12 – In December 2011, the FASB issued ASU No. 2011-12, “Deferral of the Effective Date for Amendments to the Presentation of Reclassifications of Items Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income in Accounting Standards Update No. 2011-05” (“ASU 2011-12”). ASU 2011-12 provides amendments to ASU No. 2011-05, “Presentation of Comprehensive Income,” which provides amendments to ASC No. 220 “Comprehensive Income.” The amendments in ASU 2011-12 defer only those changes in ASU 2011-05 that relate to the presentation of reclassification adjustments, to allow the Board time to redeliberate whether to present on the face of the financial statements the effects of reclassifications out of accumulated other comprehensive income on the components of net income and other comprehensive income for all periods presented. All other requirements in ASU 2011-05 are not affected by this update, including the requirement to report comprehensive income either in a single continuous financial statement or in two separate but consecutive financial statements. The amendments are effective for public entities for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning after December 15, 2011. The Company is currently assessing the impact of the adoption of this update on the Company’s consolidated financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

Risk Management

See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Market Risk and Credit Risk.” We do not believe we face any material interest rate risk, foreign currency exchange risk, equity price risk or other market risk except as disclosed in Item 7 “ – Market Risk and Credit Risk” above.

 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplemental Data

 

     Page  

Index to Financial Statements

  

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

     54   

Consolidated Statements of Financial Condition

     55   

Consolidated Statements of Operations

     56   

Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Equity

     57   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

     58   

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

     59   

Supplemental Financial Information

  

Consolidated Quarterly Results of Operations (unaudited)

     106   

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of Evercore Partners Inc.:

We have audited the accompanying consolidated statements of financial condition of Evercore Partners Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2011. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the Company’s consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2011 and 2010, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2011, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2011, based on the criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated February 29, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

/s/ DELOITTE & TOUCHE LLP

New York, New York

February 29, 2012

 

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EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION

(dollars in thousands, except per share data)

 

     December 31,  
     2011     2010  

Assets

    

Current Assets

    

Cash and Cash Equivalents

   $ 182,905      $ 141,337   

Marketable Securities

     81,288        92,830   

Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value

     127,178        52,217   

Securities Purchased Under Agreements to Resell

     2,146        126,401   

Accounts Receivable (net of allowances of $1,964 and $768 at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively)

     52,060        49,625   

Receivable from Employees and Related Parties

     7,793        3,465   

Deferred Tax Assets—Current

     8,621        5,092   

Other Current Assets

     23,869        9,982   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Current Assets

     485,860        480,949   

Investments

     108,930        60,617   

Deferred Tax Assets—Non-Current

     186,689        134,161   

Furniture, Equipment and Leasehold Improvements (net of accumulated depreciation and amortization of $13,490 and $11,302 at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively)

     21,437        14,923   

Goodwill

     177,849        139,031   

Intangible Assets (net of accumulated amortization of $25,701 and $13,337 at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively)

     40,909        49,232   

Assets Segregated for Bank Regulatory Requirements

     10,200        10,200   

Other Assets

     11,718        8,972   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Assets

   $ 1,043,592      $ 898,085   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities and Equity

    

Current Liabilities

    

Accrued Compensation and Benefits

   $ 125,869      $ 82,943   

Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses

     17,849        12,558   

Securities Sold Under Agreements to Repurchase

     129,577        178,683   

Payable to Employees and Related Parties

     12,647        4,181   

Taxes Payable

     5,159        404   

Other Current Liabilities

     11,796        8,204   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Current Liabilities

     302,897        286,973   

Notes Payable

     99,664        98,082   

Amounts Due Pursuant to Tax Receivable Agreements

     137,448        97,427   

Other Long-term Liabilities

     15,490        22,956   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Liabilities

     555,499        505,438   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Commitments and Contingencies (Note 18)

    

Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest

     22,267        25,406   

Equity

    

Evercore Partners Inc. Stockholders’ Equity

    

Common Stock

    

Class A, par value $0.01 per share (1,000,000,000 shares authorized, 31,014,265 and 21,497,691 issued at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively, and 27,941,307 and 19,983,646 outstanding at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively)

     310        215   

Class B, par value $0.01 per share (1,000,000 shares authorized, 47 and 48 issued and outstanding at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively)

     —          —     

Additional Paid-In-Capital

     575,122        400,719   

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)

     (12,058     (4,193

Retained Earnings (Deficit)

     (76,703     (61,504

Treasury Stock at Cost (3,072,958 and 1,514,045 shares at December 31, 2011 and 2010, respectively)

     (79,007     (34,538
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Evercore Partners Inc. Stockholders’ Equity

     407,664        300,699   

Noncontrolling Interest

     58,162        66,542   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Equity

     465,826        367,241   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Liabilities and Equity

   $ 1,043,592      $ 898,085   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

(dollars and share amounts in thousands, except per share data)

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,  
          2011               2010               2009       

Revenues

      

Investment Banking Revenue

   $ 430,597      $ 301,931      $ 293,311   

Investment Management Revenue

     99,161        74,610        21,164   

Other Revenue, Including Interest

     13,897        22,205        22,211   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Revenues

     543,655        398,746        336,686   

Interest Expense

     19,391        22,841        24,269   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Revenues

     524,264        375,905        312,417   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Expenses

      

Employee Compensation and Benefits

     357,680        247,737        207,592   

Occupancy and Equipment Rental

     23,497        18,081        13,727   

Professional Fees

     33,516        28,035        20,511   

Travel and Related Expenses

     23,172        16,475        9,602   

Communications and Information Services

     8,303        5,664        3,677   

Depreciation and Amortization

     17,746        9,921        4,400   

Special Charges

     3,894        —          20,129   

Acquisition and Transition Costs

     3,465        3,399        712   

Other Operating Expenses

     17,179        9,733        8,619   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Expenses

     488,452        339,045        288,969   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income Before Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments and Income Taxes

     35,812        36,860        23,448   

Income (Loss) from Equity Method Investments

     919        (557     (1,406
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Income Before Income Taxes

     36,731        36,303        22,042   

Provision for Income Taxes

     22,724        16,177        19,679   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income from Continuing Operations

     14,007        20,126        2,363   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Discontinued Operations

      

Income (Loss) from Discontinued Operations

     (4,198     (2,618     (2,264

Provision (Benefit) for Income Taxes

     (722     (297     (147

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Noncontrolling Interest

     (2,510     (1,804     (1,693
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) from Discontinued Operations

     (966     (517     (424
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income

     13,041        19,609        1,939   

Net Income Attributable to Noncontrolling Interest

     6,089        10,655        3,509   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.

   $ 6,952      $ 8,954      $ (1,570
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc. Common Shareholders:

      

From Continuing Operations

   $ 7,834      $ 9,397      $ (1,146

From Discontinued Operations

     (966     (517     (424
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.

   $ 6,868      $ 8,880      $ (1,570
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Weighted Average Shares of Class A Common Stock Outstanding

      

Basic

     26,019        19,655        15,545   

Diluted

     29,397        22,968        15,545   

Basic Net Income (Loss) Per Share Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc. Common Shareholders:

      

From Continuing Operations

   $ 0.30      $ 0.47      $ (0.07

From Discontinued Operations

     (0.04     (0.02     (0.03
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.

   $ 0.26      $ 0.45      $ (0.10
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Diluted Net Income (Loss) Per Share Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc. Common Shareholders:

      

From Continuing Operations

   $ 0.27      $ 0.41      $ (0.07

From Discontinued Operations

     (0.04     (0.02     (0.03
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Income (Loss) Attributable to Evercore Partners Inc.

   $ 0.23      $ 0.39      $ (0.10
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Dividends Declared per Share of Class A Common Stock

   $ 0.74      $ 0.63      $ 0.51   

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

(dollars in thousands, except share data)

 

    Class A  Common
Stock
    Additional
Paid-In

Capital
    Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive

Income (Loss)
    Retained
Earnings

(Deficit)
    Treasury Stock     Noncontrolling
Interest
    Total
Equity
 
    Shares     Dollars           Shares     Dollars      

Balance at December 31, 2008

    12,552,028      $ 126      $ 275,234      $ (5,139   $ (46,564     (498,746   $ (8,050   $ 15,978      $ 231,585   

Net Income (Loss)

    —          —          —          —          (1,570     —          —          1,816        246   

Other Comprehensive Income, net:

                 

Unrealized Gain on Marketable Securities, net

    —          —          —          707        —          —          —          2,174        2,881   

Foreign Currency Translation Adjustment

    —          —          —          672        —          —          —          2,372        3,044   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Comprehensive Income (Loss)

    —          —          —          1,379        (1,570     —          —          6,362        6,171   

Treasury Stock Purchases

    —          —          —          —          —          (310,553     (4,706     —          (4,706

Proceeds from Equity Offering, Net of Direct Expenses

    3,721,788        37        70,084        —          —          —          —          —          70,121   

Evercore LP Units Purchased or Converted into Class A Common Stock

    189,153        2        (57,187     —          —          —          —          (5,623     (62,808

Stock-based Compensation Awards

    692,914        7        50,959        —          —          —          —          8,552        59,518   

Dividends and Equivalents

    —          —          405        —          (8,622     —          —          —          (8,217

Noncontrolling Interest (Note 15)

    —          —          —          —          —          —          —          4,092        4,092   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2009

    17,155,883        172        339,495        (3,760     (56,756     (809,299     (12,756     29,361        295,756   

Net Income

    —          —          —          —          8,954        —          —          8,851        17,805   

Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), net:

                 

Unrealized Gain (Loss) on Marketable Securities, net

    —          —          —          (1,058     —          —          —          (1,048     (2,106

Foreign Currency Translation Adjustment

    —          —          —          625        —          —          —          294        919   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Comprehensive Income (Loss)

    —          —          —          (433     8,954        —          —          8,097        16,618   

Treasury Stock Purchases

    —          —          —          —          —          (1,286,277     (35,053     —          (35,053

Proceeds from Equity Offering, Net of Direct Expenses

    2,954,437        29        77,573        —          —          —          —          —          77,602   

Evercore LP Units Purchased or Converted into Class A Common Stock

    77,110        1        (59,062     —          —          —          —          (9,834     (68,895

Stock-based Compensation Awards

    1,310,261        13        35,695        —          —          —          —          20,059        55,767   

Shares Issued as Consideration for Acquisitions and Investments

    —          —          5,748        —          —          581,531        13,271        —          19,019   

Dividends and Equivalents

    —          —          1,344        —          (13,702     —          —          —          (12,358

Noncontrolling Interest (Note 15)

    —          —          (74     —          —          —          —          18,859        18,785   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2010

    21,497,691        215        400,719        (4,193     (61,504     (1,514,045     (34,538     66,542        367,241   

Net Income

    —          —          —          —          6,952        —          —          3,579        10,531   

Other Comprehensive Income (Loss), net:

                 

Unrealized Gain (Loss) on Marketable Securities, net

    —          —          —          (1,626     —          —          —          (338     (1,964

Foreign Currency Translation Adjustment

    —          —          —          (6,239     —          —          —          (1,880     (8,119
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Comprehensive Income (Loss)

    —          —          —          (7,865     6,952        —          —          1,361        448   

Treasury Stock Purchases

    —          —          —          —          —          (1,586,780     (45,105     —          (45,105

Proceeds from Equity Offering, Net of Direct Expenses

    5,364,991        54        167,880        —          —          —          —          —          167,934   

Evercore LP Units Purchased or Converted into Class A Common Stock

    422,843        4        (67,264     —          —          —          —          (12,268     (79,528

Stock-based Compensation Awards

    3,728,740        37        67,395        —          —          —          —          21,057        88,489   

Shares Issued as Consideration for Acquisitions and Investments

    —          —          —          —          —          27,867        636        —          636   

Dividends and Equivalents

    —          —          2,805        —          (22,151     —          —          —          (19,346

Noncontrolling Interest (Note 15)

    —          —          3,587        —          —          —          —          (18,530     (14,943
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance at December 31, 2011

    31,014,265      $ 310      $ 575,122      $ (12,058   $ (76,703     (3,072,958   $ (79,007   $ 58,162      $ 465,826   
 

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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Table of Contents

EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

(dollars in thousands)

 

     For the Years Ended December 31,  
     2011     2010     2009  

Cash Flows From Operating Activities

      

Net Income

   $ 10,531      $ 17,805      $ 246   

Adjustments to Reconcile Net Income to Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities:

      

Net Realized and Unrealized (Gains) Losses on Investments, Marketable Securities and Contingent Consideration

     (4,988     (4,898     7,111   

Equity-Based and Other Deferred Compensation

     94,253        55,914        59,518   

Depreciation, Amortization and Accretion

     20,401        11,541        5,872   

Bad Debt Expense

     1,558        1,008        444   

Deferred Taxes

     11,026        2,899        5,851   

Decrease (Increase) in Operating Assets:

      

Marketable Securities

     461        (481     (108

Financial Instruments Owned and Pledged as Collateral at Fair Value

     (91,056     75,435        76,887   

Securities Purchased Under Agreements to Resell

     123,559        66,225        (83,235

Accounts Receivable

     2,749        (18,822     844   

Receivable from Employees and Related Parties

     (4,275     1,770        (2,008

Assets Segregated for Bank Regulatory Requirements

     —          (200     (10,000

Other Assets

     (144     (1,138     (4,952

(Decrease) Increase in Operating Liabilities:

      

Accrued Compensation and Benefits

     32,128        (17,265     31,616   

Accounts Payable and Accrued Expenses

     1,499        976        776   

Securities Sold Under Agreements to Repurchase

     (32,283     (141,759     6,001   

Payables to Employees and Related Parties

     (7,067     (2,523     (1,955

Taxes Payable

     (1,777     380        (2,333

Other Liabilities

     (8,739     (1,872     (2,474
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities

     147,836        44,995        88,101   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash Flows From Investing Activities

      

Investments Purchased

     (48,575     (16,645     (4,108

Distributions of Private Equity Investments

     1,211        2,629        —     

Marketable Securities:

      

Proceeds from Sales and Maturities

     80,678        188,701        51,677   

Purchases

     (71,599     (138,683     (83,460

Cash Paid for Acquisitions, net of cash acquired

     (30,397     (70,481     (9,382

Change in Restricted Cash

     —          (820     4,853   

Purchase of Furniture, Equipment and Leasehold Improvements

     (8,662     (8,567     (2,260
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Investing Activities

     (77,344     (43,866     (42,680
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash Flows From Financing Activities

      

Payments for Settlement of Debt and Capital Lease Obligations

     (8,335     (9     (32

Issuance of Noncontrolling Interests

     1,009        4,381        17,395   

Distributions to Noncontrolling Interests—Evercore LP Limited Partners

     (19,087     (19,513     (19,741

Cash Paid for Deferred and Contingent Consideration

     (13,486     (5,936     —     

Proceeds from Equity Offering, Net of Direct Expenses

     168,140        77,185        70,761   

Purchase of Evercore LP Units and Treasury Stock

     (140,242     (114,141     (75,467

Excess Tax Benefits Associated with Equity-Based Awards

     6,266        2,923        —     

Dividends—Class A Stockholders

     (19,346     (12,358     (8,217

Other

     —          645        421   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Cash Provided by (Used in) Financing Activities

     (25,081     (66,823     (14,880
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Effect of Exchange Rate Changes on Cash

     (3,843     349        239   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash and Cash Equivalents

     41,568        (65,345     30,780   

Cash and Cash Equivalents-Beginning of Period

     141,337        206,682        175,902   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents-End of Period

   $ 182,905      $ 141,337      $ 206,682   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL CASH FLOW DISCLOSURE

      

Payments for Interest

   $ 17,914      $ 21,473      $ 23,080   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Payments for Income Taxes

   $ 13,957      $ 9,649      $ 11,286   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Furniture, Equipment and Leasehold Improvements Accrued

   $ 1,293      $ 644      $ 114   
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Decrease in Fair Value of Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest

   $ 3,942      $ —        $ —     
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

See Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

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Table of Contents

EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(dollars and share amounts in thousands, except per share amounts, unless otherwise noted)

Note 1 – Organization

Evercore Partners Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) is an investment banking and investment management firm, incorporated in Delaware on July 21, 2005 and headquartered in New York, New York. The Company is a holding company which owns a controlling interest in Evercore LP, a Delaware limited partnership (“Evercore LP”). Subsequent to the Company’s initial public offering (“IPO”), the Company became the sole general partner of Evercore LP. The Company operates from its offices in the United States, the United Kingdom, Mexico, Hong Kong and, through its affiliate Evercore G5 Holdings S.A. (“G5”), in Brazil.

The Investment Banking business includes the advisory business through which the Company provides advice to clients on significant mergers, acquisitions, divestitures and other strategic corporate transactions, with a particular focus on advising prominent multinational corporations and substantial private equity firms on large, complex transactions. The Company also provides restructuring advice to companies in financial transition, as well as to creditors, shareholders and potential acquirers. In addition, the Company provides its clients with capital markets advice, underwrites securities offerings and raises funds for financial sponsors. The Investment Banking business also includes the Institutional Equities business through which the Company offers equity research and agency-based equity securities trading for institutional investors.

The Investment Management business includes the institutional asset management business through which the Company manages financial assets for sophisticated institutional investors and provides independent fiduciary services to corporate employee benefit plans, the wealth management business through which the Company provides wealth management services for high net-worth individuals and the private equity business through which the Company, directly and through affiliates, manages private equity funds.

Note 2 – Significant Accounting Policies

Basis of Presentation – The consolidated financial statements are prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”).

The consolidated financial statements of the Company are comprised of the consolidation of Evercore LP and Evercore LP’s wholly-owned and majority-owned direct and indirect subsidiaries, including Evercore Group L.L.C. (“EGL”), a registered broker-dealer in the U.S. The Company’s policy is to consolidate all subsidiaries in which it has a controlling financial interest, as well as any variable interest entities (“VIEs”) where the Company is deemed to be the primary beneficiary, when it has the power to make the decisions that most significantly affect the economic performance of the VIE and has the obligation to absorb significant losses or the right to receive benefits that could potentially be significant to the VIE, except for certain VIEs that qualify for accounting purposes as investment companies. Generally, the Company would consolidate those entities when it absorbs a majority of the expected losses or a majority of the expected residual returns, or both, of the entities. All intercompany balances and transactions with the Company’s subsidiaries have been eliminated upon consolidation. The Consolidated Statements of Operations include the consolidated results of The Lexicon Partnership LLP (“Lexicon”) following its acquisition in 2011. See Note 4 for further disclosure.

At the time of the formation transaction, the members of Evercore LP (the “Members”) received Evercore LP partnership units (“LP Units”) in consideration for their contribution of the various entities included in the historical combined financial statements of the Company. The LP Units are subject to vesting requirements and transfer restrictions and are exchangeable on a one-for-one basis for shares of Class A common stock (“Class A Shares”). The Company accounts for exchanges of LP Units for Class A Shares based on the carrying amounts of the Members’ LP Units immediately before the exchange.

 

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Table of Contents

EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

(dollars and share amounts in thousands, except per share amounts, unless otherwise noted)

 

The Company’s interest in Evercore LP is within the scope of Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 810-20, “Determining Whether a General Partner, or the General Partners as a Group, Controls a Limited Partnership or Similar Entity When the Limited Partners Have Certain Rights”. The Company consolidates Evercore LP and records noncontrolling interest for the economic interest in Evercore LP held directly by others, which includes the Members.

The Company has evaluated all subsequent events through the date this Form 10-K was available to be issued.

Reclassifications – During 2011, certain balances for prior periods were reclassified to conform to their current presentation.

Discontinued Operations – In October 2011, Evercore Asset Management L.L.C. (“EAM”) announced its plan to wind down its business. Management and the Company made this decision because EAM was unable to attain sufficient scale to be a viable business due to several factors including the ongoing effects of the financial crisis. The wind down of EAM’s business was completed by December 31, 2011. Accordingly, the historical results of EAM have been reclassified to Discontinued Operations on the Consolidated Statements of Operations.

Accounts Receivable – Accounts Receivable consists primarily of investment banking fees and expense reimbursements charged to the Company’s clients. The Company records Accounts Receivable net of any allowance for doubtful accounts. The Company maintains an allowance for bad debts to provide coverage for estimated losses from its client receivables. The Company determines the adequacy of the allowance by estimating the probability of loss based on the Company’s analysis of the client’s creditworthiness and specifically reserves against exposure where the Company determines the receivables are impaired, which may include situations where a fee is in dispute or litigation has commenced.

Furniture, Equipment and Leasehold Improvements – Fixed assets, including office equipment, hardware and software and leasehold improvements, are stated at cost, net of accumulated depreciation and amortization. Furniture, equipment and computer hardware and software are depreciated using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of the assets, ranging from three to seven years. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the term of the lease or the useful life of the asset.

Investment Banking RevenueThe Company earns investment banking fees from our clients for providing advisory services on mergers, acquisitions, divestitures, leveraged buyouts, restructurings and similar corporate finance matters. Starting in 2010, the Company’s Investment Banking services were expanded to include services related to securities underwriting, private fund placement services and commissions for agency-based equity trading services and equity research. It is the Company’s accounting policy to recognize revenue when (i) there is persuasive evidence of an arrangement with a client, (ii) fees are fixed or determinable, (iii) the agreed-upon services have been completed and delivered to the client or the transaction or events contemplated in the engagement letter are determined to be substantially completed and (iv) collection is reasonably assured. The Company records Investment Banking Revenue on the Consolidated Statement of Operations for the following:

Advisory Fees – In general, advisory fees are paid at the time the Company signs an engagement letter, during the course of the engagement or when an engagement is completed. In some circumstances, and as a function of the terms of an engagement letter, the Company may receive retainer fees for financial advisory services concurrent with, or soon after, the execution of the engagement letter where the engagement letter will specify a future service period associated with that fee. In such circumstances, these retainer fees are initially recorded as deferred revenue and subsequently recognized as revenue during the applicable time period within which the service is rendered. Revenues related to fairness or valuation opinions are recognized when the opinion has been rendered and delivered to the client and all other requirements for revenue recognition are satisfied. Success fees for advisory services, such as merger and acquisition advice,

 

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EVERCORE PARTNERS INC.

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS—(Continued)

(dollars and share amounts in thousands, except per share amounts, unless otherwise noted)

 

are recognized when the transaction(s) or event(s) are determined to be completed or substantially completed and all other requirements for revenue recognition are satisfied. In the event the Company were to receive an opinion or success fee in advance of the completion conditions noted above, such fee would initially be recorded as deferred revenue and subsequently recognized as advisory fee revenue when the conditions of completion have been satisfied.

Placement Fees Placement fee revenues are attributable to capital raising. The Comp